PHOTO ESSAY: Great blue herons return to Stanley Park as tree clearing pauses

The birds return to nesting area next to tennis courts, while logging due to moth infestation is halted

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By ENZO GALLARDO and ALY GLENN

The great blue herons have returned this spring to Stanley Park.

Two great blue herons wait in their nest next to the tennis courts at Stanley Park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

The herons live in the trees next to the tennis courts at Stanley Park.

Great blue herons relax near their nest in a tree at Stanley park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

The herons return to the park every spring.

A great blue heron soaring above the tennis courts at Stanley Park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

A great blue heron points its beak to the sky in Stanley Park on April 5, 2024. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

Approximately 25 per cent of the park’s trees were infected, and about 20 per cent have been cleared to date.

Felled tree stumps line the ground in Stanley Park on April 5, 2024. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

The Vancouver Park Board is halting tree cutting, and crews are planting six diverse tree species to stabilize a looper moth infestation. The plan involves creating a resilient environment with the hopes of preventing further infestations.

Vancouver Park Board plans to cut down approximately 160,000 trees in Stanley Park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

Many of the trees in Stanley Park have weak roots due to drought and the moth infestation, which make them a concern for wildfires.

Western hemlock tree stumps remain following mass felling of trees in Stanley Park. The trees are being cut down due to the city’s fear of wildfires and in response to a looper moth infestation. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

Felled tree trunks lie next to stumps in Stanley Park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

Felled tree trunks lie on top of each other in Stanley Park. Photo by Enzo Gallardo

 

The degree to which herons are affected by the felling of the trees is yet be known.

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