The challenges of golfing during the fall

Golfing during the fall and winter creates unique seasonal challenges for golfers

A player golfs at McCleery Golf Course. Photo by Palak Klaire.
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by Palak Klaire

Despite the harsh weather during the fall and winter months, players can capitalize on low demand to spend more time on the green to improve their golf game, according to a South Vancouver coach.

Poor weather conditions create new obstacles for the game, said Gordon Jarvis, a coach at McCleery Golf Course. The tough conditions allow people to become better players.

“Sometimes the ground gets mucky, so if you hit your ball hard, it goes deep into the ground,” Jarvis said. “This is when the very committed students show up, and this is when they seek to start the project of making a better game for the next season.”

More rain in the fall means muddier grass which, means golf balls won’t roll

Golfer Mandeep Singh said the whole perspective of the game changes.

“During the winter season your clothes change, there are restrictions to your swing, you can’t hit as hard, the course conditions change, you have to use different clubs, your ball doesn’t roll,” he said.

Jarvis said the fall season is a great opportunity for those who want to get introduced to golf since space opens up with different coaches.

Winter clothing restricts golfers movements leading to less forceful swings

“Also, it’s the best time to actually learn something and get a new golf swing,” he said.

A motivating factor for golfers, despite the weather conditions, is that golfing is an excellent opportunity to network on the green.

Jake McCallum, director of sports at Langara, said, “for some people it’s the peace of mind, they go out there for hours where they can be on their own, focus on the game, and the rest of their problems just fade away,” he said.

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