Sun glare a contributing factor in car accidents

Change in season lead some drivers to have false sense of security in their driving ability

An elderly woman crosses the intersection of 49th Avenue and Fraser Street. Photo: Kristian Trevena
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Reported by Kristian Trevena

Sun glare can be a contrbuting factor in recent vehicular accidents according to ICBC.

This past Sunday, a 71-year-old woman was struck while crossing the intersection of SE Marine Drive and Victoria Drive in a hit-and-run, an area that is high in traffic.

On Monday, a man in his 60s was killed while crossing the intersection of 49th and Frederick Street. The driver did stay at the scene and cooperate with police, according to a media release by the Vancouver Police Department.

Joanna Linsangan, a senior communications specialist with ICBC, said even though the weather may be safer to drive in, there are still hazards in the spring and summer months.

“I think people have a false sense of security after the winter months,” Linsangan said.

To date, there have been four fatal pedestrian-related car accidents in 2019, according to the Vancouver Police Department.

In a report from ICBC, they said that speed and distracted driving were the biggest factors in collisions in 2017. On average, there are 15 fatalities each year in Vancouver.

The report, which usually takes up to a year and a half to update, is the latest detailing the factors and statistics of car accidents in B.C.

Linh Ngyuen, a Langara student who has been living in Vancouver for eight months, said she has almost been hit by a car near while walking in South Vancouver.

“I was crossing the street and the traffic light was red but a driver went through and almost hit me. It scared me,” said Ngyuen.

Ngyuen said she thinks that despite her close call, the area normally feels pretty safe, but there should be more traffic cameras in case accidents do happen.

The Lower Mainland had the highest amount of pedestrian collisions, compared to the rest of B.C. in 2017, according to ICBC.

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