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Langara College students create awareness through art

Design formation students' Birds in the 604 educates public about local bird decline

Birds in the 604 is an exhibition promoting bird conservation. Photo: Peter Vysek
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By Lindsey Lloyd

With the native bird population in Vancouver reaching new lows, Langara College’s design formation program has flocked together to create awareness through their new exhibition at the Architectural Institute of British Columbia.

Birds in the 604, a partnership exhibit between design formation students and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, is designed to educate the public on how to create a more bird-friendly environment around them.

Native birds in decline

According to the Vancouver Bird Strategy initiative report —which aims to increase awareness of native birds— there has been a 35 per cent decline in native bird species in the Pacific Coast region of Canada since 1970, because of human impact and industry.

The strategy combined with the exhibition creates conditions for birds to thrive in the city and reduce the impact that urbanization has on birds.

Rachel Li who created a bird friendly backyard, using plywood, coroplast, plexiglass and vinyl cut graphics, wants to teach Vancouverites how to preserve dwindling bird populations.

“We hope visitors could easily learn how to do it in their own backyards,” Li said.

Bev Ramey, Nature Vancouver board member and BC Nature Director, said the exhibition can teach individuals on how to preserve Vancouver’s native bird population.

“Having a wildlife friendly garden, [with] different levels of trees and shrubs, bird friendly vegetation and bird feeders,” Ramey said.

Peter Vysek, design formation instructor said working with the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation gives students opportunities to prepare for the real world.

“The exhibition projects [that] Langara design formation [students creation] live on, and keep giving to our local community by being an engaging learning experience for visitors to enjoy, furthering our commitment to education,” Vysek said. “The work and its exposure become integral to the student’s portfolio and helps them secure work upon graduation.”

The exhibition which is available to the public is free of charge and open until Nov. 3.

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