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Langara College students: Apple iOS7 update is nothing beyond looks

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Brittni Carter-Banah, arts student at Langara College, decided not to get the iOS7 because she heard it would cause her phone to crash. Photo by Bill Everitt

Nearly a month after the release of Apple’s iOS7, users are reporting mixed feelings about the newest operating system for the tech giant’s products.

The iOS7 brought a new colour scheme to Apple products, but according to Langara staff and students, not much else was beyond the update’s surface.

“It’s like updates on Facebook. They’re released all the time but it doesn’t change the product itself,” said Genevieve Robichaud, a business student, who got the update right away.

She likes the updated colours and some of the new features such as the flashlight app.

Style is more important than affordability

Dan Le Dressay, an instructor of business law at Langara College, said updates like iOS7 are a way for companies to compete on the style, instead of the price of a phone.

Asked why a company would release such a limited update, he said “the incentive of a modern company is to raise the price of stock and do this persistently.”

“If you’re the CEO of a publicly traded company, you jump the stock price or you lose your job,” he said.

Stephanie Campbell, a psychology student at Langara, felt the update was just a way to attract attention to Apple, who has been losing marketshare lately.

This is supported by a recent poll done by mobilesyrup.com.

Apple no longer highest contender

The website reports on Canadian mobile news and shows that Apple is no longer on top in North America.

The major players are Android at 43 per cent of the market, Apple with 35 per cent and BlackBerry at 19 per cent.

“Good news each quarter tends to increase awareness and raise stocks, which adds to shareholder value,” said Le Dressay.

“If stock options are how you are paid, then you need to jump those stocks to make money,” he said.

“This is an unorthodox opinion, but it’s the real world.”

Reported by Bill Everitt

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