zoning – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Fri, 15 Nov 2019 00:17:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png zoning – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Langara zoning plan in motion https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-zoning-plan-in-motion/ Thu, 14 Nov 2019 15:00:16 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=44202 By Ray Chopping A rezoning application to increase Langara’s density is expected to be complete by Spring 2020, according to a senior facilities consultant at the college. The application is to allow increased density, setting the groundwork for the future development of buildings. The rezoning application was filed to the city in the spring of […]]]>

By Ray Chopping

A rezoning application to increase Langara’s density is expected to be complete by Spring 2020, according to a senior facilities consultant at the college.

The application is to allow increased density, setting the groundwork for the future development of buildings. The rezoning application was filed to the city in the spring of 2019 and a public open house was held in July. Any building permits for new buildings would come later; the rezoning application will have no direct impact on current students.

Five-year plan underway

“Rezoning is a complex process,” said Wendy Lannard, senior facilities advisor for Langara.

The college’s five-year capital plan has identified the need for a 350,000 sq. ft. building (roughly 32,500 sq. m) at Ontario Street and 49th Avenue, but the project has yet to secure funding.

Neal Wells, communications manager for civic engagement at the City of Vancouver, said that the proposal is currently being reviewed by staff from multiple departments of the city.

“The staff will raise various questions with the application team that will need to be addressed before the application can move forward,” Wells said. These include ensuring it meets local area or community plans, design guidelines, existing zoning and is mindful of the surrounding neighbourhood context and development objectives on the site.

“Typically, by the time a proposal like this large campus master plan gets to a public hearing, an outright rejection from council is unlikely,” he said.

Different needs still a concern

Though no new buildings will be built in the immediate future, some Langara faculty members say they have pressing needs. Program coordinator of computer technology, Raymond Chow, would like to see more computer labs.

“Students use our labs for homework which makes running classes in them difficult at times.”

Lannard said the college is seeking funding from the provincial government. Once funding were approved, the following step would include hiring an architect to design it and then file a development application with the city.

 

Below are some of the proposed changes included in the Master Plan.

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Future of Vancouver’s Punjabi Market still a concern for the community https://www.langaravoice.ca/business-owners-want-more-walk-the-walk-than-talk-the-talk/ Thu, 09 Nov 2017 14:00:05 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30335 Reported by Myra Dionne Business owners want less conversation about future changes to the Punjabi Market and more action. The City of Vancouver, in partnership with LOCO BC, invited community members to meet and discuss the state of the historic market last week. One meeting took place Wednesday at Sunset Community Centre and another Thursday […]]]>

Reported by Myra Dionne

Business owners want less conversation about future changes to the Punjabi Market and more action.

Punjabi Market Fold Fabrics is one of the few shops left in the historic area of Vancouver, B.C. Photo by Myra Dionne

The City of Vancouver, in partnership with LOCO BC, invited community members to meet and discuss the state of the historic market last week. One meeting took place Wednesday at Sunset Community Centre and another Thursday at Langara College.

Satwant K. Bunwait, owner of Amrit Fashions, remembers when the market was vibrant and busy. Since 2010, her business has drastically declined, making her work a second job.

“Almost seven years this market is struggling. Rather than doing something here, they come and give a lecture or whatever, but what are they really doing for the small businesses?” said Bunwait, who attended the meeting facilitated by the city about developing a vision for the future of the Punjabi Market.

Conversations still needed
According to Jessie Singer, a planner for the city, the meetings came in response to comments made in 2015 about zoning development on the corner of 49th Avenue and Main Street.

“People wanted to say great, change is happening to the area…but we also have some other concerns about the general state of the Punjabi Market as a kind of cultural and community hub,” Singer said.

For several business owners, the old Punjabi Market died a long time ago. They said necessary changes are taking too long and they hoped the meetings would bring about immediate results.

All talk
Punjab food centre is owned by Harinder S. Toor who has been working in the historic community since 1982. Photo by Myra Dionne

Harinder S. Toor, owner of Punjab Food Center, said concerns about Langara students parking in front of his shop, beautification of the Punjabi Market, funding for Punjabi festivals and housing are among the problems community members have complained about for years.

“We were told this meeting is a three-hour meeting. We came here to spend our time and make sure we get something out of it,” Toor said. “The meeting was done and no results came up.”

Singer said the meetings were meant to engage conversation and not results. She said there is no clear date for resolving concerns but is anticipating consultation reports.

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