tuition fees – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Fri, 06 Nov 2020 00:11:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png tuition fees – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Some students say change to online not reflected by tuition https://www.langaravoice.ca/change-to-online-courses-not-reflected-by-tuition/ Wed, 04 Nov 2020 22:09:09 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=46847 By Norman Galimski Some Langara students are unhappy that tuition has remained the same even though a large majority of classes are now being taught online this semester. Like most other post-secondary institutions in B.C., Langara College’s tuition has not changed in response to the shift to remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. A typical […]]]>

By Norman Galimski

Some Langara students are unhappy that tuition has remained the same even though a large majority of classes are now being taught online this semester.

Like most other post-secondary institutions in B.C., Langara College’s tuition has not changed in response to the shift to remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A typical Langara student’s tuition for 12 credits is between $1,200 and $1,600 dollars per semester.

Langara interim academic vice-president, Margaret Heldman, explained that “tuition is not being adjusted for online classes as the content remains the same, the credentials received remain the same and the resources required for faculty and administration have remained the same.”

Some students now receive less in-class lab time than before because of COVID social distancing protocols.

To maintain social distancing guidelines, nursing labs have been split into two groups per a professor per a class. Nursing students now receive about 90 minutes of lab time instead of the previous four hours of supervised lab time per a class as these labs need to be cleaned between groups.

According to Heldman, some costs have risen for the college due to classes going online. Most prominently, these include the costs of hardware and software licensing to give teachers and students the tools to work effectively online with software such as Adobe Creative Cloud and tech support for Brightspace.

At the same time, the college is losing revenue from services such as on-campus food vendors and student and staff parking fees, which are now free for everyone on campus.

Students have varying experiences

Liam Lytton, a second-year business student , cites the difficulties of online learning and lack of instructor access as valid reasons why he believes tuition costs should go down.

For some students, online classes have some advantages.

Daniel Umejiego, a first-year engineering student, said he feels tuition “should be a little bit less” but feels he has benefitted from being able to record and rewatch lectures.

Patrick Crescenzo, a first-year kinesiology student, said he would like to see a spending breakdown and believes that “as long as [Langara] is upfront, and everybody knows where everything is going, I don’t think you’re going to have that many complaints from students.”

Crescenzo said he took the Langara Student Success Course, a free workshop that helps prepare students for online learning and post-secondary classes. He said the course focuses on “learn[ing] more about yourself as a student which is really helpful.”

The Voice requested to see the Langara budget and changes to student enrollment this year, however the college said it did not have the data for this year yet.

Langara’s 2019 College Operating and Capital Budget is available on the college website. Enrolment data for the fall semester will be available soon, according to Heldman.

Patrick Crescenzo, a first-year kinesiology student, on their thoughts about the school’s spending transparency:

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Langara College international students face six per cent tuition hike https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-college-international-students-face-six-per-cent-tuition-hike/ Wed, 18 Mar 2020 19:58:35 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=46173 By Ryan Ng A tuition fee increase for international students at Langara College has alarmed students like Henrik Braga. Braga, a third-year business student, thinks the price hike is reasonable but is also worried because his parents, back home in his native Brazil, are helping him pay for tuition. He is concerned because the Brazilian […]]]>

By Ryan Ng

A tuition fee increase for international students at Langara College has alarmed students like Henrik Braga.

Braga, a third-year business student, thinks the price hike is reasonable but is also worried because his parents, back home in his native Brazil, are helping him pay for tuition. He is concerned because the Brazilian currency is devaluing.

“I feel bad for them,” Braga said. “They’re investing a lot of money.”

Braga, who moved here in 2014, said that he understands the college needs to charge more money if they want new facilities and developments.

“I still don’t like it,” Braga said. “I wish it would be more stagnant.”

Langara College’s Board of Governors approved a six per cent increase to international student tuition fees for regular studies at its November 2019 meeting. The last increase for regular study international students took place in 2016. Students are now becoming aware of the increase as they are registering for the fall semester. 

Tanysha Klassen, chairperson of the B.C. Federation of Students, said that the tuition cost for international students is “absurd” as they pay three to six times more than domestic students. Klassen said there is not enough notice for the increase, making it hard for students to prepare.

International tuition will increase from $590 to $625.40 per credit. In contrast,  for most regular studies programs, a domestic student pays between $101.41 and $131.90 per credit.

Jatinder Singh, who is from India and studying computer studies at Langara, says he already has financial burdens. An increase will cause even more stress. 

Both Singh and Braga have concerns about the 20 hours per week work restriction during school terms set upon international students.

“If you work only 20 hours and you’re living in Vancouver and paying all your expenses by yourself, it’s tough,” Singh said.

“You have to abide by the rules they set,” Braga said. “But, at the same time, I wish they would have been more flexible.” 

According to minutes from the board, grandfathering current students at their existing rates was considered. But the board opted not to do that because the present student information system “will not support that.”

In response to a request for comment from the Board of Governors, Langara’s communications and marketing department sent an email to The Voice that said, “at this time, we are not facilitating interviews with the Board of Governors.”

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Langara Faculty Association now a living wage employer https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-faculty-association-now-a-living-wage-employer/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 14:00:48 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=41228 It’s hard to say whether Langara would benefit from paying its staff and contractors a living wage, said Langara economics instructor Bryan Breguet.]]>

Reported by Christina Dommer

It’s hard to say whether Langara would benefit from paying its staff and contractors a living wage, said Langara economics instructor Bryan Breguet.

The Langara Faculty Association became a certified Living Wage Employer in late January, joining 145 others in the Living Wage for Families Campaign.

LFA Vice President Alison Curtis said that the motion was largely symbolic.

“There’s very little impact this action will actually have on the LFA,” Curtis said.

“We have one employee. And we already pay that person a living wage, so for our union to do it, and be certified, was symbolic.”

Motion passed

Motions passed at an AGM last May reveal that the LFA plans on contacting the college and propose that they rethink their contract with Best Service Pros, which provides campus janitorial services. According to the motions, Best Service Prosis the subject of over 50 complaints of unfair labour practices at the BC Labour Relations Board.

Breguet said that much research into the living wage and its benefits is inconclusive.

“I haven’t studied the living wage in particular, but I do teach labour economics, and so as part of labour economics we discuss the impact of a higher minimum wage,” Breguet said.

“If it really was costing us a lot more, it could actually end up costing the students more because [of] the increased tuition fees and other fees out there,” he added.

Transition period

Halena Seiferling, campaign organizer at Living Wage for Families, said that the transition to a living wage doesn’t have to be sudden.

“We have lots of employers who are willing to provide advice to others who are looking to apply with us,” Seiferlingsaid. Among them are Vancity Credit Union, SAP, and the City of Vancouver.

Curtis hopes to see more post-secondary unions ride the Living Wage wave.

“We would love to see Langara have bragging rights and become the first post-secondary institution in the province to be a certified Living Wage Employer,” she said.

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Langara students join effort to halt tuition hikes. https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-students-join-effort-to-halt-tuition-hikes/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 01:00:34 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=40939 Langara students, and others across the province, were urged last week to join in a movement to cap the rising cost of education.]]>

Reported by Austin Everett

Langara students, and others across the province, were urged last week to join in a movement to cap the rising cost of post-secondary education.

The “Tuition Freeze Now” campaign started at SFU in October after their latest tuition hike, and is now backed by their student body.

All post-secondary tuition fees for domestic students are capped by the provincial government two per cent per year, but international student’s tuition can increase by up to 20 per cent per year, said SFU student campaigner Kayla Phillips.

“The consultation process was a total sham. It turns out the budget is already set in stone almost a year prior before it’s implemented,” Phillips said.

Last Thursday, students from local post-secondary schools were encouraged to attend an informational meeting about the campaign. SFU campaign organizer Giovanni HoSang said he wants to involve all public institutions even though they increase their tuition independently.

“Public education, as the name suggests, should be mostly publicly funded,” said HoSang.

The Langara International Socialists club scheduled a similar strategy session Thursday, Feb. 28 at 4:30 p.m., inviting Langara students to fight for lower tuition fees.

Langara’s chair of the physics and astronomy department Bradley Hughes, who spoke at the SFU event, is head of the Langara International Socialists club.

According to RBC economic research published in June, tuition increases can be largely attributed to a lack of government funding.

The report states that during the mid-1970s, provincial governments were paying for 75 per cent of university education costs, with the federal government transferring additional funding. Today, both provincial and federal government contributions amount to less than 50 per cent of university education costs.

Michael Koke, Langara’s director of financial services, said in an email statement that Langara has not raised international tuition for a “number of years.”

The SFU campaigners and their supporters will rally March 18 in preparation for the SFU board of governors’ meeting, March 21.

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Student tuition fees divide opinion https://www.langaravoice.ca/student-tuition-fees-divide-opinion/ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 20:00:02 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=40688 New Ontario legislation that allows post-secondary students to opt out of tuition fees that are deemed “non-mandatory” could cause more harm than good for some students, according to the Langara Student Union. ]]>

Reported by Kristian Trevena

New Ontario legislation that allows post-secondary students to opt out of tuition fees that are deemed “non-mandatory” could cause more harm than good for some students, according to the Langara Students’ Union.

In an attempt to make post-secondary education more affordable, the Ontario government announced earlier this month that students would no longer have to pay certain non-essential fees.

While some have applauded the move, others are concerned about what this might mean reduced services for students should British Columbia follow suit.

If the same legislation were passed in B.C., a withdrawal of student funding could result in many student-based events and services being taken away, the LSU said in an email statement to The Voice.

Concerns raised

“The impact it would have on students would be concerning for the services that students currently enjoy,” said the LSU Media Committee in an email.

Services that could be taken away could include the student health and dental plan, various financial aid programs, and seasonal events such as Lunar New Year, Halloween and student barbeques. The student U-pass program, which provides a transit card to students for $164 per semester instead of up to $174 per month, could also be affected.

Noah Berson, assistant chairperson of the British Columbia Federation of Students, said that the reaction to this new legislation is more negative than positive, and that taking away these services could be detrimental to students’ college and university experience.

“[These services] are what make students tick,” Berson said.

B.C. unlikely to pass legislation

Berson also said he thought that it’s unlikely B.C. will pass similar legislation, because the province’s NDP government is not like the Conservative Rob Ford government in Ontario.

Langara student Sasha Bondarchuk said tuition costs and fees should be revisited regularly because students are stretched too thin.

“They should check more often which fees can be taken out – it could make a huge difference for a student,” Bondarchuk said.

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Langara students cope with most expensive province https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-students-cope-with-most-expensive-province/ Wed, 19 Mar 2014 21:12:53 +0000 http://www.voicedev.xyz/?p=9660 For Langara students, working and help from family are ways to pay tuition without taking on student debt, which according to the Bank of Montreal is worse in B.C. than anywhere else in Canada.

B.C. students have the most debt compared to other provinces

A 2013 BMO student survey states B.C. students can expect to accumulate $34,886 in student debt, ranking amongst the highest in Canada.

The average tuition per semester at Langara for full-time students is between $1,000 and $1,500, which does not include application fees and books.

Nathan Kay, a student at Studio 58, said he worked to save his own money to pay for his tuition.

“I was a production assistant on a shoot during the [Calgary] Stampede, I was a personal assistant to a musician and I also did promotional work,” he said.

Prior to moving to Vancouver, Kay worked and went to university in Calgary where he paid his own way through school and saved enough money to pay his tuition at Langara as well.

“I know the value of a dollar now . . . I taught myself that,” said Kay.

Decrease for family’s reliance in tuition funding

The survey also said Canadian students are relying less on their family to finance higher education, down eight per cent since 2012. However, history student, Wyatt Fiddick, said he begs his grandparents to help him with school fees.

“They will pay for each grandchild’s first degree,” he said.

Andy Yeh, fourth year of business marketing, paid for his tuition by working over 30 hours a week last year - Karly Blats
Andy Yeh, fourth year of business marketing, paid for his tuition by working over 30 hours a week last year – Photo by Karly Blats

Business marketing student Andy Yeh said he worked 30 hours a week last year to pay for his tuition while going to school full-time.

Yeh said although you can get burnt out from all the work, if you enjoy your job and your studies, the struggle is worth the hard work.

BMO suggests taking advantage of “student status” to save money by seeking out promotions available to students.

 

Across the border, an 18-year-old Duke University student, stage named Belle Knox, recently made headlines for funding her school through alternative means: porn.

Knox puts herself through Duke by flying to Los Angeles during school breaks to film hardcore sex scenes. In a Globe and Mail article that came out early this month, Knox said she could make up to $1,200 a scene which goes towards her $60,000 tuition fees.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzWDPOKdq40

 

Reported by Karly Blats

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