Trevor Nault – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 29 Nov 2017 02:13:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Trevor Nault – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Early Christmas celebrations spark up conversation https://www.langaravoice.ca/early-christmas-celebrations-spark-up-conversation/ Wed, 29 Nov 2017 02:13:14 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=31277 The Vancouver Christmas Market at Jack Poole Plaza opened its gates on Nov. 22, and many are already getting a taste of the German-inspired market. The aromas of fresh chocolate and the sounds of classic Christmas carols are flowing through the Waterfront air. ]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

The Vancouver Christmas Market at Jack Poole Plaza opened its gates on Nov. 22, and many are already getting a taste of the German-inspired market. The aromas of fresh chocolate and the sounds of classic Christmas carols are flowing through the Waterfront air.

With December just days away, some Vancouver residents are pleased with the holiday festivities already kicking off, but some locals feel late November is still too early for celebrations to begin.

In this video, market visitors Josie Sykes, Marlee Gordon, Terry Field, and vendor Jordan MacDonald share their thoughts on how early is too early for Christmas festivities to begin.

 

 

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Face tattoos becoming a mainstream trend in North America https://www.langaravoice.ca/face-tattoos-becoming-a-mainstream-trend-in-north-america/ Tue, 28 Nov 2017 22:59:43 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=31171 Once the last frontier of tattoo counterculture, face tattoos appear to be going mainstream, according to a number of industry insiders. ]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault 

Once the last frontier of tattoo counterculture, face tattoos appear to be going mainstream, according to a number of industry insiders. 

Pop culture influences

Face tattoos have become more common in the media with rappers like Lil Pump, Lil Xan and Xan Frank, who has an ink portrait of Anne Frank on his face. Fashion magazine Allure declared it a trend in 2015 after makeup artist Tom Pecheux incorporated celestial themed makeup in tattoo-like designs on the model’s faces.

Tattoo artist Dan Cameron. Submitted photo.

Tattoo artist, and owner of Ambassador Tattoo based in Calgary, Dan Cameron said he has seen the trend in Eastern Europe and it’s gaining steam in North America. 

“Especially with pop culture and mainstream media exploiting that type of thing,” Cameron said. “You’re seeing it a lot more, so you’re desensitized to it, so more people are doing it.” 

Brittany Horne, a tattoo artist who describes herself as ‘the shop mom’ at Funhouse Tattoo in Vancouver said she has seen the interest in face tattoos increase. 

“It seems like it’s an everyday thing now, like it’s becoming so much more accepted,” said Horne who also sports a small black heart inked under her right eye.

‘No Regrets’

Jordie Lunn, a professional mountain biker who has an all-seeing eye tattooed on his eyelid and an ancient Viking symbol near his left eye said he has no regrets.

“I have other tattoos elsewhere that I’m not happy with visually, that I will eventually have covered with others, but I like the ones on my face,” Lund said. “Tattoos are so common now, and for the most part, accepted.” 

Michael David, manager at Gastown Tattoo Parlour, said although face tattoos have grown popularity not all shops are willing to tattoo faces. 

 “A lot of shops still go by the old-school rules that your hands and neck and above are the last spots that you get tattooed, only when you’ve ran out of all other real estate,” David said. “We don’t want to be the reason someone can’t get a job or something.”

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Documentary about Musqueam Nation hits local theatre https://www.langaravoice.ca/documentary-about-musqueam-nation-hits-local-theatre/ Thu, 23 Nov 2017 14:00:58 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30826 Vancouver's Musqueam Nation nearly having one of their important ancestral sites turned into condos is being showcased in a documentary from Dec. 1-3.]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

Vancouver’s Musqueam Nation nearly having one of their important ancestral sites turned into condos is being showcased in a documentary from Dec. 1-3.

c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city commemorates five years since the Musqueam Nation successfully halted construction of a 108-unit condo project on the site on an ancestral village in their traditional territory. The film is a partnership between the Musqueam Indian Band, the Museum of Anthropology, and the Museum of Vancouver. The site is known to the Musqueam Nation as c̓əsnaʔəm, but is more commonly known as Marpole Midden, and is located at the corner of Cartier Street and West 73rd Avenue.

A need for accurately told stories

Viviane Gosselin, director of collections and exhibitions at the Museum of Vancouver, said the popularity of the exhibition and the film speaks to a growing demand for authentic Indigenous narratives.

“I think people have this real thirst and appetite to learn from…the Musqueam people,” Gosselin said. “Having indigenous people driving the interpretive process for the exhibition is key.”

Rose Stiffarm, a cinematographer and friend of the film director, suspects the culture of reconciliation could have something to do with the film’s popularity.

“There’s certainly a craving to know more about First Nations history, because it wasn’t taught in school,” Stiffarm said. “I think there’s a lot of people who are thinking about reconciliation, and perhaps for them coming out to support Indigenous stories at the cinema is an act of reconciliation for some people.”

Angel Ine, who is Māori, said her interest in the film was sparked by a visit to the Museum of Vancouver’s exhibition last year. Visiting from Aotearoa, New Zealand, she said it was the kind of history she was seeking to learn about as a newcomer to this part of the world.

“I try to just keep actively trying to learn what I can about the worldview, narratives and language of traditional guardians of the land I live on,” Ine said.

c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city will be showing at Vancity Theatre.

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Langara Studio 58 Alumni star in local play https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-studio-58-alumni-star-in-local-play/ Thu, 23 Nov 2017 03:30:14 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30841 Reported by Trevor Nault Two Studio 58 alumni are starring in a play that tackles a grim trend in growing hate crimes against Muslims in Canada. Nathan Kay and Brandon Bagg are acting in a co-production between Neworld Theatre and Green Thumb Theatre. The play tells the story of Fatima, a young hijab wearing woman who […]]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

Two Studio 58 alumni are starring in a play that tackles a grim trend in growing hate crimes against Muslims in Canada.

Nathan Kay and Brandon Bagg are acting in a co-production between Neworld Theatre and Green Thumb Theatre. The play tells the story of Fatima, a young hijab wearing woman who transfers schools after she’s the target of a hate crime. Statistics Canada shows reported hate crimes against Muslims have more than doubled over a four-year period.

Targeting the appropriate crowd

Kay and Bagg have been touring with the production for the last few weeks, performing mostly at middle and high schools.

Kay plays Jorah, an outcast with anger issues and Fatima’s romantic interest. He said he’s glad they’re doing the show in high schools because it encourages young people to have a conversation with someone they don’t understand or someone who looks different than them.

“I think it does a really beautiful job of humanizing something that the media has worked tirelessly over the past 20 years to dehumanize,” Kay said.

Bagg plays Mr. Evans, a high school guidance counsellor who tries to help Fatima adjust to her new school.

“She’s a teenage girl who’s had death threats,” Bagg said. “And the sad truth of this is, this is not something that’s hard to fabricate. This is something that’s happened.”

Matching sensitivity with humour

Chelsea Haberlin, the director, said knew she had a serious subject on her hands but she knew how to handle it, thanks to Marcus Youssef’s script.

“It’s also really funny,” Haberlin said. “[Audiences] are kind of surprised the play is as entertaining as it is.”

Jabber will be performed at Progress Lab 1422 at 8 p.m. Nov. 25 and admission is by donation. All proceeds go to the Immigrant Services Society of BC.

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TransLink says commuters will have to wait until 2018 for more buses on 100 route https://www.langaravoice.ca/translink-says-commuters-will-have-to-wait-until-2018-for-more-buses-on-100-route/ Sat, 18 Nov 2017 18:30:15 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30620 Frustrated commuters on the 100 bus route who experience multiple pass ups shouldn’t expect changes in service until September 2018, according to a spokesperson for TransLink.]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

Frustrated commuters on the 100 bus route who experience multiple pass ups shouldn’t expect changes in service until Sept. 2018, according to a spokesperson for TransLink.

Although there was the biggest transportation upgrade in a decade over this summer, the 100 has yet to receive additional service, according Chris Bryan, senior media relations advisor for TransLink. In August, the bus had one of its lowest pass up rates in 2017 with 388 pass up events, but then that number grew to 883 in September.

Kaysha George, who works at the Lush manufacturing distribution centre, said she experiences pass ups or late buses almost every day.

“I don’t always get passed up. A lot of the time they just don’t show up, or they’re like 25 minutes late,” she said. “Every day, after a long day at work, or groceries, I get to stand for 45 minutes, if I get on the bus.”

TransLink plans on expanding bus services

Bryan said TransLink is aware of the problems with the 100, and that it is in the top 10 per cent of buses with overcrowding.

“The 100 22nd Street Station [to] Marpole Loop is one of the fastest-growing routes in the region,” said Bryan in an email. “Relief is on the way for the 100. In September 2018, we are adding an additional 1-2 trips per hour during the morning and afternoon peak.”

Mohammed Khan, a temporary worker with Labour Unlimited, said TransLink needs to do something about service on the 100 before September 2018.

“That’s too late, we need them now. We need better service,” Khan said. “A lot of us in this area depend on the 100 to use the SkyTrain or to take a link from the Marpole area to continue on. What they need to do is add more buses to the 100 line.”

Source: Chris Bryan, TransLink
Senior Media Relations Advisor
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Langara Falcons men’s basketball team supports their star forward’s development https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-falcons-mens-basketball-team-supports-their-star-forwards-development/ Thu, 16 Nov 2017 20:32:34 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30707 Reported by Trevor Nault Langara Falcons men’s basketball team’s tallest forward, Grant Galbraith has grown in more ways than just in height. The Vancouver native started his basketball career in high school before accepting a scholarship to play for the University of Alberta Golden Bears. Galbraith’s coach and teammates say his biggest area of growth […]]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

Langara Falcons men’s basketball team’s tallest forward, Grant Galbraith has grown in more ways than just in height.

The Vancouver native started his basketball career in high school before accepting a scholarship to play for the University of Alberta Golden Bears. Galbraith’s coach and teammates say his biggest area of growth over the years is his mental game.

“He knows who he is, and he knows what he can do and he really plays to those strengths,” the Falcons’ head coach, Paul Eberhardt said. “You’d be surprised how unique that is to have that as a trait.”

Teammate Timothy Choi supports Eberhardt’s comments

Timothy Choi would know better than anyone. This season marks his third year playing along side Galbraith.

“I think he’s a lot stronger mentally,” Choi said. “A lot of things used to get in his head really quickly, but this year he’s doing a lot better with that.”

With a win and a loss under their belts, the team’s home opener on Nov. 16 will break the tie. Eberhardt said he is grateful for Galbraith’s return to Vancouver.

“Grant is a really important role for us because when we need to get something near the hoop, he’s the inside, he’s our go-to guy every time,” Eberhardt said.

As likely as anybody to make the finals: Galbraith

The Falcon’s host Columbia Bible College on Nov. 16 and Quest University in Squamish on Nov. 17.

Galbraith attributes the likelihood of a successful season to the quality of the rest of his team and said he believes the Falcons have as good a chance at making finals as anybody.

“I think we have a great group of guys,” Galbraith said. “I’m confident in myself and I’m confident in everyone around me and hopefully we can make this year memorable and win a championship like we’re hoping to.”

 

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Maori All Blacks make Vancouver appearance as rugby continues to grow in Canada https://www.langaravoice.ca/maori-all-blacks-make-vancouver-appearance-as-rugby-continues-to-grow-in-canada/ Wed, 08 Nov 2017 20:22:20 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30365 A record crowd packed BC Place on Friday to watch the Maori All Blacks destroy the Canadian men’s rugby team and Canada couldn’t be more excited.]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

A record crowd packed BC Place on Friday to watch the Maori All Blacks destroy the Canadian men’s rugby team and Canada couldn’t be more excited.

Jorden Sandover-Best, a rookie on Canada’s national rugby team and former UBC Thunderbird, believes the sell-out crowd is only the start of something bigger for rugby in Canada.

According to data from Statistics Canada and Canadian Heritage, soccer, swimming and hockey have traditionally dominated the list of sports played by youth in Canada. Rugby’s never broken the top ten, but Sandover-Best is hopeful that trend could change.

“It’s the fastest growing sport, it’s on the up. There’s so much going on. It’s been popular all around the world and it’s just been catching on in the last ten years or so from my perspective,” Sandover-Best said of Canada’s rugby scene. Canada currently has 263 registered rugby clubs.

Though Canada has yet to win a game against the All Blacks this season, nearly 30,000 fans came to watch their 51-9 loss on Friday, the single largest crowd for a fifteens match in Canadian rugby history.

“It’s not a traditional rugby country,” said Clayton McMillan, coach of the Maori All Blacks. “Thirty thousand fans here, It’s a great advertisement for rugby worldwide.”

“[The fans] were very vocal and passionate, and that certainly added to the occasion,” McMillan said.

Phillip Mack, Rugby Canada’s team captain has seen the game grow since high school.

“In high school, I didn’t know what rugby was, it was just thrown on me and I took to it and I just didn’t look back,” Mack said.

“We’ve seen an exciting growth of the popularity of rugby in Canada, based on the the success of the Olympics in Rio, key tournaments like Canada Sevens in Vancouver and Langford and the men’s and women’s Rugby World Cups,” said Dustin Hopkins, Director of National Development, Rugby Canada.

Canada heads to Europe now to play Georgia on Nov. 11, Spain on Nov. 18 and Fiji on Nov. 25. They’ll return to Vancouver on Jan. 27 to take on Uruguay in an attempt to qualify for the 2019 Rugby World Cup.

Video by Evan Hagedorn 

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Sole Aboriginal Student Rep candidate rejected, questions raised about LSU elections https://www.langaravoice.ca/30283-2/ https://www.langaravoice.ca/30283-2/#comments Thu, 02 Nov 2017 01:00:49 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30283 Reported by Trevor Nault The lack of Aboriginal student representation at Langara College has raised questions about the Langara Students’ Union’s electoral process. An LSU student election last month resulted in Aboriginal student representative candidate, Angeline Day, rejected by a nearly 4-1 margin. . Because Day was running unopposed, she was subject to a yes […]]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

The lack of Aboriginal student representation at Langara College has raised questions about the Langara Students’ Union’s electoral process.

An LSU student election last month resulted in Aboriginal student representative candidate, Angeline Day, rejected by a nearly 4-1 margin. . Because Day was running unopposed, she was subject to a yes or no vote.

Day was not available for comment but her mother, former Vancouver school trustee candidate Diana Day, had questions about the LSU’s electoral process.

“We’re still all shocked about how that went down,” Diana said. “Because she was the only one running, she should have gotten in by acclamation. It should not have been a decision that was yes or no.”

Lack of representation hurts students

Langara’s director of Aboriginal Education and Services, Rick Ouellet said the LSU needs to do more to make Indigenous students feel welcome on campus.

“If the students don’t feel like they’re represented by the student’s society, and they don’t feel welcome in their space, then they don’t get the services that the student’s society is supposed to provide,” Ouellet said.

Concerns raised over aboriginal space in LSU

Diana expressed concern for the Dave Pearson Native Student Centre, a space gifted by the college to Aboriginal students in the (LSU) Student Union Building. She said it isn’t being used for what it was intended.

Ouellet said he’s heard anecdotally that students have been asked to prove their indigenous ancestry to use the space.

“That absolutely goes against any culture that I’ve learned about,” Ouellet said.

Verucah Poirier, a first-year Aboriginal Studies student, expressed concerns about the election.

“It seems weird,” she said. “We were all suspicious.”

Charlene Lawrence, a second-year arts and science student said she was confused by the process.

“Why was there even a ‘no’ option?” Lawrence said. “We should have an Aboriginal representative.”

The Voice reached out to the LSU’s diversity & inclusion representative, Harjot Grewal, and chief returning officer Jeannie Bates. Neither responded to requests for comment.

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Lack of sanitary waste bins in men’s washrooms may breach Human Rights Code https://www.langaravoice.ca/lack-of-sanitary-waste-bins-in-mens-washrooms-may-breach-human-rights-code/ Thu, 02 Nov 2017 01:00:15 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30112 The lack of waste bins for menstrual products in men’s washroom stalls at Langara College could be a violation of British Columbia’s Human Rights Code, according to three human rights lawyers]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

The lack of waste bins for menstrual products in men’s washroom stalls at Langara College could be a violation of British Columbia’s Human Rights Code, according to three human rights lawyers.

Responding to the issue raised in The Voice last week, Dan Soiseth of Community Legal Assistance Society said that while the application of human rights law can be highly circumstantial, “to the extent that transgender people aren’t feeling welcome to use the washroom facilities, that could possibly be discrimination.”

A simple solution

Richard Johnson at Kent Employment Law sees it as an issue that can be easily fixed.

“The act of putting these [stall disposal bins] in a ‘male washroom’ is not undue hardship, so to create fair and equal treatment, in my view they would need to put them in,” Johnson said.

Last week, two transgender students at Langara spoke out about a lack of private menstrual waste bins in men’s washroom stalls.

The likelihood of this issue going to court isn’t too high, according to Lindsay Waddell of Moore Edgar Lyster. However, she  believes it could be a breach of the Human Rights Code.

“I certainly think it could constitute a violation of the Human Rights Code,” Waddell said.

“I would hope it wouldn’t get there because the resolution is very simple.”

Importance of discussion

Sherry Chin-Shue, Langara’s director of labour relations and human rights, was not in a position to formally commit to any facilities modifications, she stressed the importance of engaging in a dialogue with staff and students.

“If there are individuals who require accommodation for specific things, we want to talk to them. We want to try and work through it and provide a reasonable accommodation,” she said.

“Our community is built through consultation and collaboration together.”

Robin Holmes, a transgender student at Langara, brought the issue to The Voice’s attention last week, and  said he’s looking forward to collaborating with the school.

“I really want more people to be aware of this issue,” he said.

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Lack of sanitary waste bins an issue for trans men at Langara College https://www.langaravoice.ca/lack-of-sanitary-waste-bins-an-issue-for-trans-men-at-langara-college/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 17:31:17 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=29921 Reported by Trevor Nault Two transgender students at Langara are speaking out about a lack of private waste bins for menstrual products in men’s washroom stalls, an issue that some trans rights activists are saying is receiving public attention for the first time. Robin Holmes, 21, and Vincent Chorabik, 25, both trans men, told The […]]]>

Reported by Trevor Nault

Two transgender students at Langara are speaking out about a lack of private waste bins for menstrual products in men’s washroom stalls, an issue that some trans rights activists are saying is receiving public attention for the first time.

Robin Holmes, 21, and Vincent Chorabik, 25, both trans men, told The Voice they feel forced into an embarrassing predicament during their menstrual cycles because men’s washroom stalls don’t provide a means to discard the pads and tampons discreetly.

“If I’m on the cycle, and I go in there, I’m not going to have a place to put that, and no one wants to have to carry it out and throw it into the regular garbage bin,” Holmes said.

Forced to use women’s washroom to properly dispose of waste

Though Holmes, a second-year associate of arts student said he can blend in to use women’s washrooms, he said it doesn’t make sense for him internally.

“It’s like an existential crisis every time I walk up there,” Holmes said.

Chorabik, a fine arts student, laughed at the idea of using women’s washrooms.

“I have an obvious beard,” Chorabik said. “That would just freak people out.”

No formal complaints have been made

Transgender activists Rachel Andrus and Marie Little said they’d never heard of anyone formally complaining about the issue, though Little said she can recall a bar room conversation about the subject.

“It’s fairly cost neutral to put one in each bathroom. Those things are maybe 20 bucks,” Andrus said.

Langara’s facilities manager Raymond Yeung said in an emailed statement he hadn’t heard the need raised before but said the cost of installing the bins would not be “prohibitive”.

He also noted the college was working to update signage on all of the universal washrooms on campus.

Though Holmes understands the goal of campus-wide acceptance and tolerance can seem overwhelming to some, he suggested baby steps.

“This is a great place to start,” Holmes said.

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