Tim Horton’s – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Mon, 29 Mar 2021 02:09:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Tim Horton’s – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 East Vancouver neighbourhood ‘drowning’ in takeout garbage https://www.langaravoice.ca/east-vancouver-neighbourhood-drowning-in-takeout-garbage/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 01:06:43 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48564 By Emily Lyth Every day, David Faber cleans up the litter that has accumulated on his front lawn on Victoria Drive with a bucket and trash picker in hand. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, trash from local businesses has been increasingly ending up on the lawns, streets and alleyways of the Victoria-Fraserview neighbourhood. Faber has […]]]>

By Emily Lyth

Every day, David Faber cleans up the litter that has accumulated on his front lawn on Victoria Drive with a bucket and trash picker in hand.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, trash from local businesses has been increasingly ending up on the lawns, streets and alleyways of the Victoria-Fraserview neighbourhood.

Faber has lived in the neighbourhood since 2011 and said that the trash problem is getting worse.

259 million takeout containers were disposed of in 2020

“We’ve seen a real increase, especially over the last year, in the amount of street garbage in our neighbourhood,” Faber said.

A recent waste composition study surveying disposal facilities in the Metro Vancouver Regional District revealed that an estimated 259 million takeout containers were disposed of in 2020, compared to 179 million in 2018. Containers left on the streets remained unaccounted for in those estimates.

According to Faber, the proximity of the McDonald’s, Starbucks and Tim Hortons at the intersection of East 41st Avenue and Victoria Drive has increased the amount of takeout waste found in the neighbourhood.

“I think they’re ashamed,” said Faber, who sent letters to all three businesses demanding accountability. He has yet to receive a response.

A manager at the Tim Hortons, which opened in 2020, said that while building staff clean the restaurant’s exterior on a regular basis, Tim Hortons employees only do so if business is slow.

Managers at the neighbouring McDonald’s and Starbucks said that their employees are required to clean up litter on their company’s property, but any garbage found on the surrounding streets is not their responsibility.

Tim Blunt, a lifelong South Vancouver resident, said that people are also discarding large pieces of furniture and debris in the alleyways over the past few years.

“It’s just a daily mess of people dumping garbage bags, and construction stuff, and more mattresses,” said Blunt. “It’s disheartening for me, I guess, because it shows a lack of pride in the community.”

‘Disposal does come at a cost to the city’

Vancouver city councillor Pete Fry said that the disposal fees for mattresses lead to their illegal dumping.

“It does take a delicate balance, because obviously disposal does come at a cost to the city,” said Fry. “The real barrier is a lack of convenient places to dispose of things.”

Monique Koningstein, executive director of the Victoria Drive Business Improvement Association, said that garbage cans are “crucial” to have near takeout businesses.

Prior to the pandemic, the Victoria Drive BIA employed Coast Mental Health Foundation workers to clean the area five days a week.

The foundation has had to cease all clean-up operations during the pandemic due to safety concerns.

Koningstein said the Victoria Drive BIA is negotiating a new contract with the foundation. In the meantime, the area’s cleanliness depends on weekly litter collection service provided by the City of Vancouver.

“That’s why we’re still seeing a lot of garbage on the street,” said Koningstein. “But as far as businesses and their responsibility, that’s something we feel they have to deal with themselves.”

Faber said placing a garbage can next to the bus stop in front of his home would encourage people not to litter.

“If people don’t deal with it now, we’re going to drown in our own garbage,” said Faber.

Video by Emily Lyth below…

 

 

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Tim Hortons’ new kiosks success still undetermined https://www.langaravoice.ca/tim-hortons-new-kiosks-success-still-undetermined/ Mon, 11 Nov 2019 19:23:57 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=44100 By Lina Chung Two new kiosks installed to improve wait times at Langara’s Tim Hortons, have left some waiting. Chartwells Canada, the company that manages the food services at Langara, worked with the college to install two Tim Horton’s self-serve kiosks in an attempt to alleviate long line-ups. The units became functional at the end […]]]>

By Lina Chung

Two new kiosks installed to improve wait times at Langara’s Tim Hortons, have left some waiting.

Chartwells Canada, the company that manages the food services at Langara, worked with the college to install two Tim Horton’s self-serve kiosks in an attempt to alleviate long line-ups. The units became functional at the end of August.

Langara student Nabi Akhtar, who frequents the kiosks, said one has often been out of service and is semi-satisfied with wait times.

“There could be some improvements, especially if they fixed the other kiosk,” Akhtar said.

Out of service, out of patience

Rizwan Bandali, Chartwells’ Food Services Director, said they have keys to open the kiosk and do a reboot. If a reboot doesn’t correct the error, the next step is to contact SyCom Technologies, a third-party tech support company, to troubleshoot.

“Last time, it was a long process. It took us a couple of hours,” Bandali said.

Anh Nguyen, an accounting student, who for the past two weeks has exclusively used the kiosks, said she is happy overall with the shortened wait time.

In regards to lining up for the counter, “I don’t want to waste my time,” Nguyen said.

Eva Hartkopf, a women studies student, said she believes many customers don’t use them because they simply don’t know about them.

A hidden gem

According to Mark Adams, director of ancillary services at Langara, two locations were considered for the kiosks. They chose the current location due to cable and network connections and avoiding potential hallways congestion issues.

In regards to wait times at the Tim Hortons, Adams said, “We’ve kind of become victims of our own success.” 

For customers not wanting to use the kiosks or stand in line to order from the counter, there is another option. Tim Hortons launched their own App for mobile purchasing in July 2017, which can also be used for pickup orders at the Langara location.

 

Reporter Lina Chung tests out the new Tim Hortons self serve kiosks

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Double your chances at rolling up for Tim Horton’s 50th anniversary https://www.langaravoice.ca/double-your-chances-at-rolling-up-for-tim-hortons-50th-anniversary/ Wed, 26 Feb 2014 23:21:14 +0000 http://www.voicedev.xyz/?p=8991 To celebrate their 50th anniversary, Tim Hortons have issued a bonus roll. Photo by Karly Blats
To celebrate their 50th anniversary, Tim Hortons have issued a bonus roll. Photo by Karly Blats

The Roll Up the Rim to Win promotion at Tim Hortons has not attracted more students than normal to the already busy coffee shop on campus.

This year marks Tim Hortons’ 50th anniversary. The restaurant is celebrating by doubling the chances to win on their roll-up cups, rather than the original single roll. However, although chances may be doubled only one win per cup is possible.

Campus Tim Hortons is ‘always busy’

In the early stages the chain’s annual promotion, campus employee Kiran Johal, said she hasn’t noticed a drastic change in the amount of customers coming through to get their daily caffeine.

“We’re always busy,” said Johal. She also added that there hasn’t been any major wins yet, “just some coffee and donuts.”

Across the campus at Starbucks, the baristas agreed their number of patron’s hasn’t gone down.

Christine Ho has worked at the campus Starbucks for four years. , She said she hasn’t noticed a decrease in customers since Roll Up the Rim to Win started and that “every day is busy.”

Tim Hortons first began Roll Up the Rim to Win in 1986 when the largest prize was a snack pack of Timbits.

Deland Jessop, instructor in Langara’s school of management, said the promotion isn’t likely to create a major boost in sales for the restaurant but is probably kept going to keep customers happy.

“There’s very few marketing events where it becomes so engrained in the customers mind,” said Jessop. “If all of a sudden they stop doing it, it might irk some customers.”

Langara students have their loyalties

Sticking to routine plays a big part in many Langara students’ coffee shop choices.

Computer science student Jimmy Li said he drinks Tim Hortons coffee regardless of possibly winning a car.

Syeed Rafid, an arts and science student, said he’s not persuaded by Tim Hortons promotion and remains consistent with his coffee choice.

“I’m a Starbucks guy,” he said.

Business management student Steve Iverson disagrees.

“I always drink Tim Hortons but I come more often now that it’s Roll Up the Rim.” said Iverson.

Additional to in-store contests, Tim Hortons is also holding an online game called Rockin’ RRRoll Up Roulette, offering 10,000 more prizes on their website.

Reported by Karly Blats

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