Ray Chopping – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Tue, 24 Mar 2020 21:40:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Ray Chopping – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Voice Radio Ep. 16 – Video Gaming Addiction https://www.langaravoice.ca/voice-radio-ep-16-gaming-distraction/ Thu, 28 Nov 2019 20:25:59 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=45036 Produced by Lucas Jornitz   Is video gaming addiction any different from any other compulsive disorder?   In this week’s podcast, Ray Chopping and Agazy Mengesha talks about video game addiction.   The duo interviews video gaming fans, one of whom plays for over ten hours daily.    They also interview a mental health counsellor who talks about why […]]]>

Produced by Lucas Jornitz 

 Is video gaming addiction any different from any other compulsive disorder? 

 In this week’s podcast, Ray Chopping and Agazy Mengesha talks about video game addiction. 

 The duo interviews video gaming fans, one of whom plays for over ten hours daily.  

 They also interview a mental health counsellor who talks about why video gaming addiction occurs, and why it needs to be taken more seriously. 

 

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Black Friday fizzles in Canada https://www.langaravoice.ca/black-friday-fizzles-in-canada/ Wed, 27 Nov 2019 03:00:43 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=44706 Reported by Ray Chopping Vancouver stores are gearing up for this year’s Black Friday sales event, but not all consumers are convinced there are deals to be had. “It’s not likely to make me want to buy anything I don’t need,” Keith Loh, an out-of-work software engineer, said. Black Friday blasts Boxing Day According to […]]]>

Reported by Ray Chopping

Vancouver stores are gearing up for this year’s Black Friday sales event, but not all consumers are convinced there are deals to be had.

“It’s not likely to make me want to buy anything I don’t need,” Keith Loh, an out-of-work software engineer, said.

Black Friday blasts Boxing Day

According to a Retail Council of Canada survey earlier this month, almost 43 per cent of Canadians said they would likely be taking advantage of the Black Friday sales this year, something the big stores will be looking to cash in on.

There are more deals to be had this year than ever before,  said Anjee Gill, communications specialist for Best Buy Canada. “We will have hundreds of items on sale.”

Best Buy first introduced Black Friday sales to its Canadian stores back in 2012, when they only had 30 items on sale, Gill said.

The RCC survey also showed that the Black Friday sales event in Canada has now surpassed the traditional Boxing Day sales as Canada’s number one sales event.

What was once only a United States phenomenon has now become just as important this side of the border.

“People get a lot of their news from the U.S., so they’re very used to Black Friday,” Loh said.

Customers unconvinced

But not everyone is buying into the hype. Gursewak Singh, a computer studies student at Langara College, said he will not be buying anything this Black Friday.

“I’m more likely to buy something on Cyber Monday,” Singh said.

Another Vancouver resident, David Gao, who lives right next door to the Best Buy on Granville Street, said that while he always buys in store, he wasn’t planning on buying anything this coming Black Friday.

“I don’t see too much difference between Black Friday and the normal sales,” Gao said.

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Studio 58 : diversifying plays brought to life on stage https://www.langaravoice.ca/studio-58-diversifying-plays-brought-to-life-on-stage/ Thu, 21 Nov 2019 15:00:59 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=44595 A plan is set to bring about more culturally diverse pieces is stalled due to lack of funds]]>

By Ray Chopping

A Langara-funded research project aimed at increasing diversity in its theatre programs has stalled after insufficient funding.

The project will provide Langara’s contemporary art curriculum with plays, scenes and monologues, which will more directly reflect the cultural mix of the students who bring the works alive on stage. 

Artistic director of Studio 58 Kathryn Shaw, who is spearheading the project, said there has been a severe lack of diversity in Canada’s theatrical teaching curriculums for a long time.

The project

The project was started by Shaw in the summer of 2018 after receiving a Research and Scholarly Activity Fund award from Langara.

According to Shaw, the goal of the project is “to diversify and decolonize the Studio 58 curriculum.” 

Kelly Sveinson, the chair of Langara’s Applied Research Centre said that awards allow Langara faculty members to pursue projects outside their main curriculum, which help deepen the college’s teachings.

Shaw used the grant money to hire two research assistants and compile a database of more than 600 plays from around the world.

“We need to stretch beyond the canon of old white men’s plays,” Shaw said. “We need to find voices from all ethnicities, women and LGBTQ and better reflect them to our own diverse student body.”

Funds running out

But with the award money exhausted to pay for the research assistants, the project has effectively stalled.

“I simply don’t have the time to do it,” Shaw said.

Plays found in the new database are proving popular with students.

“It’s a really important thing that Kathryn is doing,” said Silken Lawson, a third-term student from Studio 58.

Studio 58’s current production Anon(ymous), a contemporary re-imagining of The Odyssey, directed by Carmen Aguirre, is just one of the plays found through Shaw’s database project.

Anon(ymous) narrates a story of a young refugee boy who travels to the U.S. looking for his mother who has disappeared. 

Contributor Lauren Gargiulo expresses her opinion: Opinion: Playwrights needs more diversity

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Langara zoning plan in motion https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-zoning-plan-in-motion/ Thu, 14 Nov 2019 15:00:16 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=44202 By Ray Chopping A rezoning application to increase Langara’s density is expected to be complete by Spring 2020, according to a senior facilities consultant at the college. The application is to allow increased density, setting the groundwork for the future development of buildings. The rezoning application was filed to the city in the spring of […]]]>

By Ray Chopping

A rezoning application to increase Langara’s density is expected to be complete by Spring 2020, according to a senior facilities consultant at the college.

The application is to allow increased density, setting the groundwork for the future development of buildings. The rezoning application was filed to the city in the spring of 2019 and a public open house was held in July. Any building permits for new buildings would come later; the rezoning application will have no direct impact on current students.

Five-year plan underway

“Rezoning is a complex process,” said Wendy Lannard, senior facilities advisor for Langara.

The college’s five-year capital plan has identified the need for a 350,000 sq. ft. building (roughly 32,500 sq. m) at Ontario Street and 49th Avenue, but the project has yet to secure funding.

Neal Wells, communications manager for civic engagement at the City of Vancouver, said that the proposal is currently being reviewed by staff from multiple departments of the city.

“The staff will raise various questions with the application team that will need to be addressed before the application can move forward,” Wells said. These include ensuring it meets local area or community plans, design guidelines, existing zoning and is mindful of the surrounding neighbourhood context and development objectives on the site.

“Typically, by the time a proposal like this large campus master plan gets to a public hearing, an outright rejection from council is unlikely,” he said.

Different needs still a concern

Though no new buildings will be built in the immediate future, some Langara faculty members say they have pressing needs. Program coordinator of computer technology, Raymond Chow, would like to see more computer labs.

“Students use our labs for homework which makes running classes in them difficult at times.”

Lannard said the college is seeking funding from the provincial government. Once funding were approved, the following step would include hiring an architect to design it and then file a development application with the city.

 

Below are some of the proposed changes included in the Master Plan.

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Community orchestra brings people together https://www.langaravoice.ca/community-orchestra-brings-people-together/ Fri, 01 Nov 2019 14:00:45 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43773 Reported by Ray Chopping Many people take the time to learn to play a musical instrument growing up and during their schooling — but where does a classically trained musician go in South Vancouver to continue practising their art? Vancouver’s community orchestras provide non-professional musicians a place to practise and perform their art in large […]]]>

Reported by Ray Chopping

Many people take the time to learn to play a musical instrument growing up and during their schooling — but where does a classically trained musician go in South Vancouver to continue practising their art?

Vancouver’s community orchestras provide non-professional musicians a place to practise and perform their art in large ensembles.

Vancouver Pops Orchestra, located on 8881 Selkirk St,  was founded by Tom Kuo in 2008. The orchestra’s mission is to provide a fun, progressive and challenging environment for musicians to grow and thrive.

 Operating as a charity, Kuo feels it is important that Vancouver Pops is affordable and open to as many people as possible.

 “We really want to be here for the community,” said Kuo.

Only option

 For many musicians, whose music is not the primary source of their income, the community orchestra is the only available option they have to play.

 “The orchestra really helped me to feel part of the community,” said Kimira Reddy, a violin player who moved to Vancouver from South Africa three-years-ago.

 Wendy Koh, another violinist, said to her the comradery was a very important part of being in the orchestra.

“Arts are crucial to our development as individuals,” said Koh

SFU professor of music, David MacIntyre, believes the role community orchestras play in Vancouver is essential to keeping big ensemble music alive.

 Many of the musicians who play in these community orchestras bring an enormous amount of experience with them. They allow players to “continue making music while making a living doing something else,” said MacIntyre.

Not professional but not amateur either

 A Little Night Music Orchestra’s conductor and music director, Alana Chan, believes that while it’s fair to say a community orchestra is not professional, it would also be unfair to call them amateur too.

 “They fall somewhere in between,” said Chan.

In an email, A Little Night Music Orchestra member Linda Ronald says that she has been playing at the orchestra for 35 years, Ronald stated that she even does sessions with her daughter.

“Alana is a great conductor, very full of enthusiasm. She has brought some exciting changes including many guest performers,” stated Ronald.

Both orchestras regularly put on Christmas and Spring shows each year throughout the city. 

Violinist Matthew Low feels that our city can always use more art. 

“Not everyone can afford to watch the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra,” said Low.

 

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Bus strike could cause major problems for Langara https://www.langaravoice.ca/bus-strike-could-cause-major-problems-for-langara/ Thu, 24 Oct 2019 08:14:32 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43582 By Ray Chopping Updated Oct. 31, 2019: Translink has confirmed that Unifor will take strike action beginning with a uniform ban by operators, and an overtime ban by maintenance workers. Students should be prepared for a  reduction in bus and SeaBus services as soon as 8:00 am tomorrow. Updated Oct. 30, 2019:  Unifor locals 111 […]]]>

By Ray Chopping

Updated Oct. 31, 2019: Translink has confirmed that Unifor will take strike action beginning with a uniform ban by operators, and an overtime ban by maintenance workers. Students should be prepared for a  reduction in bus and SeaBus services as soon as 8:00 am tomorrow.

Updated Oct. 30, 2019:  Unifor locals 111 and 2200 issued 72 hours’ notice of a possible strike action. 

Bus drivers will be walking off the job as early as Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, many Langara students and staff will face some disruptions to transit service. The college has said in the event of job action, it will remain open as usual with regularly scheduled classes and services.

Limited travel options

Langara’s 2017 Transportation Survey Report showed that 88 percent of respondents used transit to reach the campus.

Aaron Marty, an environmental studies student, said that a transit strike would be very problematic for him.

“My only way to get here would be taxi,” said Marty.

Situated on South Vancouver’s 49 Ave., Langara College is primarily serviced by the 49 bus route, the second busiest bus route in the province.

Studio 58 theatre student Sofie Kane said, “It’s the main way we get to school.”

While the survey showed that transit was a prominent option for respondents located in Vancouver, the results suggest that transit is even more popular among those traveling from further away. The survey stated that 96 percent of respondents located in Surrey relied on transit.

Business administration student Srikant Raturi said that a transit strike would be devastating for him as he relies heavily on the transit system.

“I take two buses and a train, so I don’t think I’d be able to reach the college,” said Raturi.

Moving Forward

The college is encouraging students, staff, and faculty to find alternative transportation, suggesting options such as carpools or cycling.

“We are monitoring the situation closely and considering our plans should there be job action by transit workers,” Sherry Chin-Shue, director of human resource operations at Langara,” said in an earlier email.

In 2001, transit operators went on strike for over 100 days, in what became Metro Vancouver’s longest transit strike to date.

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Vancouver South candidates on the need for bus decongestion https://www.langaravoice.ca/vancouver-south-candidates-on-the-need-for-bus-decongestion/ Wed, 23 Oct 2019 18:56:08 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43330 Green Party and NDP candidates in Vancouver South say they use public transit, while other candidates did not confirm so during an all-candidates forum at Langara College.]]>

Reported by Kristen Holliday, Anita Zhu, Lauren Garguilo, Ray Chopping, and Soubhik Chakrabarti

Green Party and NDP candidates in Vancouver South say they use public transit, while other candidates did not confirm so during an all-candidates forum at Langara College.

Most of the candidates agreed that the 49 bus route which runs in front of the campus is too crowded.

“Right now, we have more busses on 49th and 41st,” Harjit Sajjan, the Liberal Party candidate and incumbent for Vancouver South said.

“There is a plan still in place to be able to increase that. But we need to do even more,” he said.

Bus pains

The 49 bus is the second busiest route in Vancouver with 20 per cent of the trips being overcrowded despite running every five minutes.

Garima Mittal, a Langara Health Sciences student, says while bus service has improved, the wait for a bus is a frustrating part of her rush-hour commute.

“Normally, I wait for ten minutes, but during evenings, it gets to 20 minutes,” she said.

Green candidate Judy Zaichkowsky, a frequent transit rider, said she understands what students have to go through.

“That line should be a B-line from Metrotown to UBC,” Zaichkowsky said, referring to the 49 bus. “You would have two buses on there, one more local and one that only stops at intersections where people transfer.”

Plans for the future

Sajjan said the Liberal party had a plan to increase bus service on the 49th and 41st arteries, but also mentioned the importance of looking at other routes.

An NDP government, candidate Sean McQuillan said, would incorporate different transportation services, including more Skytrains.

“We would make sure there will be infrastructure for more light rail systems,” he said.

The PPC has no transportation platform at this time, while Conservative candidate Wai Young did not attend the forum.

 

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Opinion: Boomers, time to take a step back https://www.langaravoice.ca/boomers-time-to-take-a-step-back/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:32:38 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43279 by Ray Chopping The underrepresentation of youth among Canadian members of parliament remains a persistent problem across federal politics. Elected in 2011 at age 19, Pierre-Luc Dusseault was the youngest ever MP to be elected to the house. He remains the youngest MP today at age 28 and is amongst three in the House of […]]]>

by Ray Chopping

The underrepresentation of youth among Canadian members of parliament remains a persistent problem across federal politics.

Elected in 2011 at age 19, Pierre-Luc Dusseault was the youngest ever MP to be elected to the house. He remains the youngest MP today at age 28 and is amongst three in the House of Commons who are under 30-years old.
This lack of youth representation is troubling due to several factors.

Over the last five federal elections Baby Boomers represented the majority of voters, therefore little consideration was given to younger voters. These youth had neither the numbers nor taxable income to compete with the Boomer majority so the politicians largely ignored them.


Millennials have essentially grown up under a series of political systems that have been indifferent to their needs and dismissive of their political concerns.

The results speak for themselves: lower voter turnout is a reflection of Millennial disinterest in federal politics. Compare that with the 21 per cent difference between Boomer and Millennial voter turnout and the generation which cares speaks for itself.

In 2015, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals were the first to take notice of the youth vote. Despite major criticism of his young age and lack of experience, Trudeau attracted a 15 per cent increase of younger voters from the previous election.

Political parties this time around recognize that Millennials make up the majority of the voting block. As a result we can see that considerably younger politicians have been set forth as party leaders. Andrew Scheer and Jagmeet Singh are both 40 and Trudeau is 47, some of the youngest leaders in Canadian history.

Will putting a younger face forward intrigue Millennials enough to show up at the polls? With the power to enact real change Millennials could be changing this country for good.

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2019 Federal Election – Vancouver Quadra https://www.langaravoice.ca/2019-federal-election-vancouver-quadra/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 17:32:24 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43340 ]]>

2019 Federal Election - Vancouver Quadra

VANCOUVER QUADRA   
Conservative PartyLiberal PartyNew Democratic PartyGreen PartyPeople's Party of Canada


Kathleen Dixon

“Conservatives will support our economy so that hard-working students will graduate and be able to get high paying jobs in their fields.”




Joyce Murray

“Your voice matters. In 2015, high youth-voter turnout helped us elect Canada’s most progressive government in Canada’s history… we have increased student grants and made it easier to pay back student loans. Don’t miss your opportunity to have a say.”




Leigh Kenny

“Young Canadians are filled with creativity and ingenuity… entrepreneurism is bringing in new products and industry especially in emerging green technology.”




Geoff Wright

“We need to move away from a hydro-carbon economy and switch to sustainable energy… we expect to reduce hydro-carbon emissions and CO2 emissions by 60% from the 2005 levels.”




Sandra Filosof-Schipper

“The most important aspect is individual freedom… it will ensure prosperity, scientific solutions on saving our planet and getting people out of poverty.”


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2019 Federal Election – Vancouver Granville https://www.langaravoice.ca/2019-federal-election-vancouver-granville/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 17:31:23 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=43337 ]]>

2019 Federal Election - Vancouver Granville

VANCOUVER GRANVILLE    
Conservative PartyLiberal PartyNew Democratic PartyGreen PartyPeople's Party of CanadaIndependant



Zach Segal

“My main focus is making sure life is more affordable so that people can get ahead, not just get by.”




Taleeb Noormohamed

“Over the last four years, the Liberal government has taken decisive action on climate change, on housing, and on ensuring that young Canadians have the same opportunities as their parents. We need to keep that momentum going.”






Yvonne Hanson

“Get out and join protests, join rallies, join groups, volunteer on campaigns. Young people, get involved with politics.”






Louise Boutin

“The climate is the biggest issue for youth. We need to change how we are living. Young people are already starting to change the way they commute: they are taking buses, riding bicycles, walking. They understand that we have to change.”





Naomi Chocyk

“Our immigration policy can benefit Canadians only if we welcome the right kind of immigrants. It should prioritize Canada’s economic interests and be calibrated in a way that does not jeopardize Canadian values.”





Jody Wilson-Raybould

“The high cost of living in Vancouver has made it difficult for professionals, especially young professionals, to stay in the area and work when they have completed their education.”
“Politicians of all stripes in all countries are being accussed of failing young people and youths are starting to understand our betrayal. For our collective lack of action we are being told, 'how dare you'. None of us are immune to this criticism.”



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