performance – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 27 Mar 2019 23:57:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png performance – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Wacky travel show a hit at Langara https://www.langaravoice.ca/wacky-travel-show-a-hit-at-langara/ Sat, 30 Mar 2019 00:00:24 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=41850 A Langara photography alumnus’s passion for documenting his travels enabled him to share his unique experience with a wide audience.]]>

Reported by Kim Lau

A Langara photography alumnus’s passion for documenting his travels enabled him to share his unique experience with a wide audience. It was the simple joy of meeting the people on his travels that made him feel lucky and happy.

“The people I met in Tibet, Burma and India are incredibly funny, kind and happy people. The more remote I’ve been, the kinder people are. Simpler life makes it more joyful,” William Jans said.

Jans is a professional photographer who graduated from Langara’s photography department and has a knack for storytelling using images he captured on his travels around the world.

That’s the pull to his long-standing travel shows, which have been seen by 80,000 Canadians over 17 years.

His latest show, A Man, A Plan, Japan, was performed at Langara on March 22.

“I’ve produced nine different shows in total. And I’m very proud to have received a standing ovation for the sold-out Shadows in Morocco show which premiered on March 15,” Jans said.

A sense of adventure

Jans said that his sense of adventure, his willingness to assimilate with the locals and learn their languages while looking for the positives in people, opened himself up to absurd events which enriched his narratives and provided a sense of the unexpected, which his viewers love about him.

The A Man, A Plan, Japan performance at Langara was Tim Nim’s second viewing.

“Jans’s narration was very good. He made it very interesting to follow along. And the way he combined still photographs to video clips made it more entertaining and interesting. It was very good,” Nim said.

Eric and Caroline Liu first saw the show about five years ago. Since then, they have visited Japan three times.

Last Friday, they returned to the theatre to reminisce about their time in Japan.

“Jans’s show was a bit of a reference as to where to go when we finally made the trip to Japan, three times in all.”

“We went to a lot of the places Jans talked about,” Caroline Liu said.

“We were able to compare what we did and what he did. We love it,” Liu said.

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Celebrations for Vancouver’s Drag Scene Anything But a Drag https://www.langaravoice.ca/celebrations-for-vancouvers-drag-scene-anything-but-a-drag/ Tue, 27 Mar 2018 19:39:17 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=33084 Reported by Cloe Logan Gender will be performed in many ways throughout Vancouver this weekend as the anniversary of a drag troupe merges with celebrations for Transgender Day of Visibility. Man Up originated a decade ago as a club night where female bodied drag kings could perform in Vancouver. Today, it has become a group […]]]>

Reported by Cloe Logan

Gender will be performed in many ways throughout Vancouver this weekend as the anniversary of a drag troupe merges with celebrations for Transgender Day of Visibility.

Man Up originated a decade ago as a club night where female bodied drag kings could perform in Vancouver. Today, it has become a group that welcomes “drag queens, kings and things” to perform a myriad of gender expressions.

Paige “Ponyboy” Frewer was one of the initial organizers of Man Up, but said the collaboration between the community and performers was responsible for the evolution of the event.  

“Where we’re at now compared to where we started is just this incredibly varied and multifaceted concept of gender performance and being an all-bodies, all genders sort of scene,” Frewer said.

When Cazzwell van Dyke started performing drag locally 13 years ago, they said there was a lack of respect between drag kings and queens. According to them, the timing of Man Up’s fruition glued the two scenes together, and allowed all gender performers to collaborate.

Cazzwell van Dyke is known for their David Bowie performances, which you can witness at Man Up’s anniversary party this Friday, March 30. (Dezzart Photography)

I feel like Man Up has bonded the community together and helped heal some of those wounds that did not necessarily need to be there,” Van Dyke said.

Recently, an international drag icon publicly said they would “probably not” allow a trans woman to compete on the reality show RuPaul’s Drag Race. For Frewer, the popularity of the show has positively influenced the drag scene by making queer visibility more mainstream, but can be oppressive by not recognizing the variety of forms drag can consist of.  

“We’re trying to push those boundaries and be more inclusive and radical,” Frewer said.

Frewer and van Dyke both perform with Anasteja Layne, a transgender activist, in Man-Up. Layne started a new performance troupe eight months ago called Coconutz and Bananas for trans performers, which will perform at The Odyssey for Transgender Day of Visibility on Saturday, the night after Man Up’s 10 year anniversary celebration.

“If you can be a person who’s passionate about mastering arts as a whole and you have something you want to say to the world, then you are absolutely included into the drag scene,” Layne said.

“It doesn’t matter if you black, white, blue, cisgendered, non-binary or trans you just have to have the courage to stand up on stage and deliver that message,” Layne-Siren said.

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