Music – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 24 Mar 2021 23:52:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Music – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Vancouverites fight social isolation sadness by picking up musical instruments https://www.langaravoice.ca/vancouverites-fight-social-isolation-sadness-by-picking-up-musical-instruments/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 23:41:19 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48352 By Jan Bevilacqua One year ago, as countries enacted strict lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, people in seclusion took to their balconies with guitars and tambourines to support the country’s front-line workers.  Later, as Dr. Bonnie Henry pleaded for people to stay home, some discovered they could actually use this time in seclusion […]]]>

By Jan Bevilacqua

One year ago, as countries enacted strict lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, people in seclusion took to their balconies with guitars and tambourines to support the country’s front-line workers. 

Later, as Dr. Bonnie Henry pleaded for people to stay home, some discovered they could actually use this time in seclusion to graduate from tambourine to trombone. The pandemic was the perfect time to learn a new instrument.

For first-year Langara student Liam Sachs, learning to play a new musical instrument was a way to stay productive.

“It’s cool to have a hobby that you can take a step back and look at and think about yourself in a more positive way,” he said.

Sachs, who says he has always been musically inclined, learned the bass guitar and ukulele to help pass the time while he observes strict social distancing with his immunocompromised partner. 

Coping with COVID depression

According to a recent survey by Mental Health Research Canada, 42 per cent of Canadians reported higher levels of anxiety and depression. 

Sean Manning didn’t pick up a guitar until the end of 2020. By then, the realities of isolation were setting in. 

“I wasn’t really doing a whole lot,” said Manning, a former restaurant server, who was laid off in March 2020. “I was slipping into depression a little bit.”

Manning, who had always wanted to learn guitar, said that practicing daily has taught him discipline. 

“It is something that you have to focus on and put aside time every day,” he said, before admitting that learning guitar is not as easy as he thought it would be. 

He is taking advantage of the free lessons he received with the purchase of his Fender guitar. 

Accessible lessons

Some music schools have also began offering classes online. 

Daphne “Ruby” Roubini, who has taught ukulele for 12 years through her Vancouver music school, Ruby’s Ukes, moved her class of nearly 300 students online.

Teaching music through live Zoom classes has been a challenge for Roubini, but it has allowed her to welcome new students living outside of Vancouver. 

She hopes to have students back in class by September, if allowed, but will continue to offer the online course for international students.

For Roubini, learning the ukulele isn’t about the destination. It is about the journey. 

“It’s not about achievement,” she said. “It’s about the joy of music.”

Watch and listen as Liam and Sean go more in-depth about their newly found hobbies:

 

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Voice Radio dailies edition: Weyes Blood’s new album Titanic Rising https://www.langaravoice.ca/voice-radio-dailies-edition-weyes-bloods-new-album-titanic-rising/ Fri, 05 Apr 2019 19:20:50 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=42124 Album art for Weyes Blood's Titanic RisingTitanic rising, Weyes Blood's fourth album, comes out today on Sub Pop. She will play St. James Hall in Vancouver on May 17.]]> Album art for Weyes Blood's Titanic Rising

Weyes Blood’s new album Titanic Rising is making waves among music critics.

Hosts Nick Laba and Maxim Fossey share their thoughts on the sounds and themes of her instrumentally lush collection of songs.

The Pennsylvania-raised artist released her fourth album today on Sub Pop records, the label that rose to fame after signing 90s grunge acts like Kurt Cobain, who died 25 years ago today.

Weyes Blood, known for her 70s rock sound reminiscent of Karen Carpenter and Bob Seger, will play St. James Hall in Vancouver on May 17.

Watch the music video for “Movies”

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Making ‘music of rebellion’ https://www.langaravoice.ca/making-music-of-rebellion/ Thu, 30 Nov 2017 00:37:23 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=31333 An artist from El Salvador is sparking a social revolution by fusing different cultural musical elements.]]>

Reported by Lisa Tanh

An artist from El Salvador is sparking a social revolution by fusing different cultural  musical elements.

Balam Axayacatl Santos Antonio, lead member of the band Kin Balam said musical fusion brings humanity closer to a better world.

“Whether that’s evolution, revolution, love, unifying, community, this [is] building a better life and building up a better world and society,” said Antonio.He claims to be the first artist to fuse Indigenous, Flamenco, Afro-Latin jazz, hip hop, Mesoamerican, South American and Central American music together. The band incorporates traditional instruments from various cultures such as: fish-shaped ocarinas, whistles, Congas bongos, afro-Latin jazz drums and Flamenco guitar.

“I’m not trying to be a classical guitarist, hip-hop artist [or] just a Native American musician,” Antonio said. “I’m breaking all these archetypes, molds and paradigms that we’re supposed to follow.”

Inciting rebellion through music

Collectively, Kin Balam’s songs are described as a “music of rebellion.”

Balam playing the Flamenco guitar at Cafe Deux Soleil Nov. 23, 2017 Photo by Lisa Tanh

“It’s rebellion against all the systems that try to cage us. It’s rebellion against all the voices that try to shut us down. It’s rebellion against all the racism that has been imposed on us. It’s just an expression of the way I try to break free and it’s powerful,” Antonio said.

Kiko Martin, a friend and fan who has attended every show, said Kin Balam’s music creates an awakening impact.

“He does a lot of Indigenous music and that’s very different from the type of music that you hear nowadays like rap, hip-hop. There’s nothing wrong with that but he has a lot of influences in his music.”

‘Never heard anything like him’

Cyrus Tionghay, another fan, said he has never heard anything like him.

“He’s very wise and spiritual,” Tionghay said. “I feel if you just get to know him and if he comes out with more albums, it’s going to heighten your spirituality and stuff.”

“I hope that [Kin Balam] pushes people to be more just in the way the live, the way they think and the way they connect to everyone around them and themselves,” Antonio said.

On Dec. 10, Kin Balam will be performing at the Calabash Bistro on Carrall Street.

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Langara student’s hip hop music video now online https://www.langaravoice.ca/langara-students-music-video-now-online/ Mon, 17 Feb 2014 19:32:22 +0000 http://www.voicedev.xyz/?p=8645 On Feb. 7 our reporter David La Riviere wrote a story about Langara business student Eyren Uggenti’s music video for his song Where I Wanna Be (Langara). The video is now online and you can watch it here.

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All-ages music venues needed in Vancouver but won’t change much https://www.langaravoice.ca/ages-music-venues-needed-vancouver-wont-change-much/ Wed, 09 Oct 2013 18:03:42 +0000 http://www.voicedev.xyz/?p=6509 Illustration by James McLaughlin
Illustration by James McLaughlin

Like a weed surfacing between cracks in the asphalt, Vancouver’s independent music scene is a testament to resilience.

A venue gets shut down, another one opens. A venue gets shut down, another one opens. I can count at least a dozen off the top of my head. Spraying one weed means another will just pop up down the road, no matter how paved-over the cultural landscape appears to be.

Every other weekend in high school I would sit on public transit for an hour and a half to go to basement shows in East Vancouver. Often I would miss the last band because I had to leave early to catch the last train back home, another hour-and-a-half ride. I know kids from Langley who still do the same thing.

I raise this point not to paint myself as some artistic martyr, but to highlight something overlooked by city officials and the police who continuously scour the internet posing as music fans looking for the next illegal show: underground music fills a cultural void left behind by the likes of Live Nation.

Much has been done recently to combat Vancouver’s “no fun city” moniker. Earlier this year council passed the Arts and Culture Indoor Event Pilot Program to try to bridge live music in “non-traditional” venues to the city’s building code. The Safe Amplification Site Society, a local lobby group for all-ages performance spaces, has made strides securing a permanent space. And the provincial government has finally begun consulting with the public to modernize its liquor laws.

For the most part these are steps in the right direction. A permanent all-ages, all-accessible venue that abides by all the city’s building codes, such as the one SafeAmp has almost secured, is badly needed and would be a valuable asset to the city. But creating a weed-sanctuary will not contain the abhorrent multiplicity of roots and seeds that comprise Vancouver’s independent music scene.

DIY music is a romanticized ideal and a powerful social force that, by definition, flourishes beyond the control of formalized authority. Conforming to the parameters set by the city means less hassle from police, and in turn landlords. But the hassle is part of its biology.

By James McLaughlin

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