heritage – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 28 Feb 2018 23:15:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png heritage – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Punjabi Market Preserving its Heritage Through Stories https://www.langaravoice.ca/punjabi-market-preserving-its-heritage-through-stories/ Wed, 28 Feb 2018 18:10:16 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=32205 Punjabi Market came back to life last Sunday through anecdotes and cups of chai tea, as residents and business owners came together to share the importance of keeping its history alive.]]>

Reported by Myra Dionne

Punjabi Market came back to life last Sunday through anecdotes and cups of chai tea, as residents and business owners came together to share the importance of keeping it’s history alive.

Vancouver Heritage Foundation invited community members for breakfast at All India Sweets Restaurant to raise awareness of the market’s historical significance. In this video exclusive, Jessica Quan, special projects coordinator, explains why the market is a place that matters.  

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Historic Celtic Shipyards need bylaw protection to secure existence https://www.langaravoice.ca/historic-celtic-shipyards-need-bylaw-protection-to-secure-existence/ Fri, 17 Nov 2017 20:00:15 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=30633 The birthplace of Vancouver’s ship repair and fishing industry is at risk of being sold, redeveloped and forgotten because the industrial site from the 1800s hasn’t been granted heritage status, according to local advocates.]]>

Reported by Becca Clarkson

The birthplace of Vancouver’s ship repair and fishing industry is at risk of being sold, redeveloped and forgotten because the industrial site from the 1800s hasn’t been granted heritage status, according to local advocates.

Celtic Shipyards was put on Heritage Vancouver’s 2017 Top10 Watch List, because it’s currently for sale. The City of Vancouver is updating its heritage program for the first time since 1986 and the site’s status is among hundreds to be reviewed in 2018.

Marco D’Agostini, senior heritage planner for the City of Vancouver, said that the Celtic Shipyards would need designation and protection from a heritage bylaw, not just heritage status.

“Having heritage status for a building only identifies it and provides opportunities for receiving incentives, like additional density or different types of uses, to encourage the retention for the building,” said D’Agostini, who wouldn’t speak to whether there are prospective buyers for the Celtic Shipyards.

Preserving history before real estate development cuts in

Heritage Vancouver, led by president Javier Campos, advocates for preserving Vancouver’s history during the rapidly increasing land values in the city, where new construction is less costly than retention.

“They’re not going to get as much revenue so [the city is] not going to be happy about it,” said Campos, who worries that the history of economically significant industries, as well as the Japanese families who were sent to internment camps “will be forgotten and we’ll have condos or something instead and we won’t understand what was there in our history.”

Roy Uyeda was born in the Celtic Cannery before the Second World War and he was part of the Japanese community living at the shipyards. During the war they were all sent to internment camps.

“It was somewhat like the salmon returning to its birthplace,” said Uyeda about returning to the cannery 12 years after his family was forced to leave in 1946. “To think that the site could be sold off, developed into glass, steel and concrete matter, completely wiping out any vestige of that quaint little fishing hamlet of Celtic Cannery, is exasperatingly despairing.”

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Century-old homes saved from bulldozers and relocate to a new neighbourhood https://www.langaravoice.ca/century-old-homes-moves-to-a-new-home/ Mon, 17 Mar 2014 21:37:11 +0000 http://www.voicedev.xyz/?p=9577 Residents and citizens all across Metro Vancouver gathered this morning on West 43rd Avenue where two century-old homes, The Dorothies, were slowly moved to their new neighbourhoods two block away by heavy-duty trucks.

A neighbourhood affair

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Construction workers prepare for the move scheduled for 9:30 a.m.

A crowd of about 100 people surrounded the scene, taking pictures and catching up with old friends at the historic event. Another 50 to 70 construction and traffic control staff facilitated the careful move three months in the making, according to the president of house moving company Nickel Bros, Jeremy Nickel.

The move, which reportedly costs about $250,000 to $350,000 is paid by developer Trasolini Chetner. They hope to incorporate the structures in a new townhouse development.

Scott Keenlyside’s legacy

Walter Keenlyside is the great grandson of Scott Keenlyside who built the two “gems”.

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Crews gather around president of Nickel Bros, Jeremy Nickel for a debrief before the move.

“It’s a tragedy to tear down these [heritage] homes.” He spoke with pride about his great grandfather’s forward-thinking ideas,  who he believes was one of the first architects to use reclaimed material in construction.

Local resident Seymour Kelly has been a neighbour of The Dorothies for 11 years. He arrived early to watch the commotion from across the street with mixed feelings of excitement and detachment to old homes with heritage.

“I’m not stirred about demolishing old homes. New homes are progress,” says Kelly.

Prior to the move, Nickel reminded staff on the significance of the event to the nearby community. Unlike other job sites, he added that staff should refrain from swearing and ensure that the job site remains clean.

Reported by Jenny Peng

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