#Emily Lyth – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:59:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png #Emily Lyth – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Studio 58 musical Monoceros debuts under the stars https://www.langaravoice.ca/studio-58-musical-monoceros-debuts-under-the-stars/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:10:26 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48712 Reported by Emily Lyth Wearing masks designed for vocal performance, Langara’s Studio 58 theatre students showcased a musical titled Monoceros in a creative outdoor tent set-up. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the students couldn’t perform the musical, which was commissioned by the Toronto-based Musical Stage Company, in front of an audience indoors. Instead, they presented the […]]]>

Reported by Emily Lyth

Wearing masks designed for vocal performance, Langara’s Studio 58 theatre students showcased a musical titled Monoceros in a creative outdoor tent set-up.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the students couldn’t perform the musical, which was commissioned by the Toronto-based Musical Stage Company, in front of an audience indoors.

Instead, they presented the musical from March 25-28 in front of a small audience composed only of Studio 58 students and faculty members.

Silken Lawson, a third-year theatre arts student, said that adapting to a pandemic-friendly stage environment was challenging.

“It’s been a big shift learning how to perform and create your own energy on stage, instead of taking it from people who are watching you,” Lawson said.

Silken Lawson, a cast member in the Monoceros musical, has been rehearsing in an outdoor tent on the Langara campus. Photo: Emily Lyth

The idea to perform the musical in outdoor tents can be attributed to Courtenay Dobbie, Studio 58’s new artistic director, who has experience working in outdoor theatre.

The students collaborated on Monoceros with established theatre professionals, including a director, music supervisor, writers, composers and lyricists.

Stage under the stars

The outdoor set-up, referred to as an “outdoor musical theatre lab,” consisted of one main tent where the actors performed and three smaller tents for production elements, including live keyboard and percussion music.

In the main tent, students sat on stools eight feet apart from each other and wore face masks designed to allow proper voice resonance when singing.

Anton Lipovetsky, a composer-lyricist for Monoceros, said the masks “kind of look like bird beaks.” Their structured shape enables a wearer to breathe deeply and open their mouth wide enough to sing loudly without causing the mask to cave in like a typical cloth or disposable face mask might.

Lipovetsky said that rehearsing in face masks put a spin on what a traditional musical looks like for the students.

“They have the challenge of acting without seeing their faces, so it’s almost like voice acting,” said Lipovetsky. “There’s a real emphasis on the language, the music and the text, hearing it apart from the staging.”

Anton Lipovetsky is a composer-lyricist for Monoceros and a creative at the Toronto-based Musical Stage Company. Photo: Emily Lyth
Playing in the big leagues

Third-year acting student Jacob Leonard said that working with theatre professionals was a great experience.

“I think the craziest thing for me is watching their turnaround,” Leonard said. “Because this is a workshop and because [Monoceros] is constantly in flux, they’re just pumping out material.”

Both Lawson and Leonard are graduating from Studio 58’s acting program this spring.

Lawson said that performing Monoceros has been the highlight of her last year.

“Getting to be on campus and just hanging out and singing songs with my friends is something that I’m gonna miss a lot when I graduate,” Lawson said.

Lipovetsky said the students at Studio 58 taught him what true positivity is.

“It can be super gruelling being outdoors — cold, wind, rain — and I see all the students, and they’re just beaming and shining,” Lipovetsky said.

“It inspires me, I want to find that in myself when I see that.”

A short documentary film of Studio 58’s work from the past year, including Monoceros, is set to be released online in April.

 Watch Monoceros cast members talk about performing outside in the video below:

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East Vancouver neighbourhood ‘drowning’ in takeout garbage https://www.langaravoice.ca/east-vancouver-neighbourhood-drowning-in-takeout-garbage/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 01:06:43 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48564 By Emily Lyth Every day, David Faber cleans up the litter that has accumulated on his front lawn on Victoria Drive with a bucket and trash picker in hand. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, trash from local businesses has been increasingly ending up on the lawns, streets and alleyways of the Victoria-Fraserview neighbourhood. Faber has […]]]>

By Emily Lyth

Every day, David Faber cleans up the litter that has accumulated on his front lawn on Victoria Drive with a bucket and trash picker in hand.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, trash from local businesses has been increasingly ending up on the lawns, streets and alleyways of the Victoria-Fraserview neighbourhood.

Faber has lived in the neighbourhood since 2011 and said that the trash problem is getting worse.

259 million takeout containers were disposed of in 2020

“We’ve seen a real increase, especially over the last year, in the amount of street garbage in our neighbourhood,” Faber said.

A recent waste composition study surveying disposal facilities in the Metro Vancouver Regional District revealed that an estimated 259 million takeout containers were disposed of in 2020, compared to 179 million in 2018. Containers left on the streets remained unaccounted for in those estimates.

According to Faber, the proximity of the McDonald’s, Starbucks and Tim Hortons at the intersection of East 41st Avenue and Victoria Drive has increased the amount of takeout waste found in the neighbourhood.

“I think they’re ashamed,” said Faber, who sent letters to all three businesses demanding accountability. He has yet to receive a response.

A manager at the Tim Hortons, which opened in 2020, said that while building staff clean the restaurant’s exterior on a regular basis, Tim Hortons employees only do so if business is slow.

Managers at the neighbouring McDonald’s and Starbucks said that their employees are required to clean up litter on their company’s property, but any garbage found on the surrounding streets is not their responsibility.

Tim Blunt, a lifelong South Vancouver resident, said that people are also discarding large pieces of furniture and debris in the alleyways over the past few years.

“It’s just a daily mess of people dumping garbage bags, and construction stuff, and more mattresses,” said Blunt. “It’s disheartening for me, I guess, because it shows a lack of pride in the community.”

‘Disposal does come at a cost to the city’

Vancouver city councillor Pete Fry said that the disposal fees for mattresses lead to their illegal dumping.

“It does take a delicate balance, because obviously disposal does come at a cost to the city,” said Fry. “The real barrier is a lack of convenient places to dispose of things.”

Monique Koningstein, executive director of the Victoria Drive Business Improvement Association, said that garbage cans are “crucial” to have near takeout businesses.

Prior to the pandemic, the Victoria Drive BIA employed Coast Mental Health Foundation workers to clean the area five days a week.

The foundation has had to cease all clean-up operations during the pandemic due to safety concerns.

Koningstein said the Victoria Drive BIA is negotiating a new contract with the foundation. In the meantime, the area’s cleanliness depends on weekly litter collection service provided by the City of Vancouver.

“That’s why we’re still seeing a lot of garbage on the street,” said Koningstein. “But as far as businesses and their responsibility, that’s something we feel they have to deal with themselves.”

Faber said placing a garbage can next to the bus stop in front of his home would encourage people not to litter.

“If people don’t deal with it now, we’re going to drown in our own garbage,” said Faber.

Video by Emily Lyth below…

 

 

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Voice Radio Ep. 24 – Science jobs, the community garden’s future and a meme contest https://www.langaravoice.ca/voice-radio-ep-24-science-jobs-the-community-gardens-future-and-a-meme-contest/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 21:04:42 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48062 Produced by Norman Galimski, Emily Lyth and Maxine Ellis In this week’s episode, Emily Lyth takes a look at what the future of the Langara community garden looks like and Maxine Ellis speaks to an expert on advice for students looking for a job in the science field during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lastly, editor Norman […]]]>

Produced by Norman Galimski, Emily Lyth and Maxine Ellis

In this week’s episode, Emily Lyth takes a look at what the future of the Langara community garden looks like and Maxine Ellis speaks to an expert on advice for students looking for a job in the science field during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lastly, editor Norman Galimski takes a look at the college’s newest strategy to get the word out on academic integrity – through a meme contest on the college’s Instagram page.

The winning meme of the Langara academic integrity meme contest by Hamza Islam.
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