dogs – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Thu, 18 Oct 2018 16:50:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png dogs – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Canine caregiving course to be offered on campus https://www.langaravoice.ca/canine-caregiving-course-to-be-offered-on-campus/ Thu, 18 Oct 2018 16:55:05 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=33675 Reported by Joe Ayres Canine caregivers with risk management certificates are receiving priority status when pursuing a career in the canine industry. “If somebody were to drop off a resume and I saw [the professional dog walking certificate] we would definitely put them at the top of the list,” said Jess Tam, manager of Doghouse […]]]>

Reported by Joe Ayres

Canine caregivers with risk management certificates are receiving priority status when pursuing a career in the canine industry.

“If somebody were to drop off a resume and I saw [the professional dog walking certificate] we would definitely put them at the top of the list,” said Jess Tam, manager of Doghouse Daycare.

In response to the demand for canine caregiving, Langara College is offering a course in canine risk management starting on campus this Saturday.

Karen Ramsden, the professional dog walker certificate program coordinator, said the course covers the unknown threats coming from the outdoors and inside the home, along with how to keep dogs safe during dog fights.

“It’s also about keeping yourself safe with encounters you might have with other people [and] with other dogs you might meet on the path,”  Ramsden said.

Program can help in pursuing a career with animals

This course is a remolded expansion of the previous Keeping Dogs Safe course, and part of the professional dog walker certificate program. The certificate aims to give those pursuing work in dog handling more leverage when pursing a career. Graduates will add essential skills like teaching bylaws, first aid, and safety to their resumés.

“If you’re a dog walker, you have to make sure all the dogs fit well within the pack … if you have a reactive dog and it’s upsetting it can set them all off and become a dangerous thing,” said Tam.

Rebecca Ledger, animal behaviour and welfare scientist at Langara College, said in an email statement:

“What a regulated professional dog walking body would provide is assurances to clients that their dog walker knows how to manage challenging dogs, and prevent or deal with problems as the risk arises.”

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Cute Halloween costumes for pets potentially hazardous https://www.langaravoice.ca/cute-halloween-costumes-for-pets-potentially-hazardous/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 16:00:12 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=29906 Reported by Ana Rose Walkey Pet costumes are cute. They are not always safe. Last year, the number of people who dressed up their pets rose by 2 per cent from 2015, according to the National Retail Federation. Dressing pets up for Halloween is becoming more popular with owners, but they need to be cautious […]]]>

Reported by Ana Rose Walkey

Pet costumes are cute. They are not always safe.

Last year, the number of people who dressed up their pets rose by 2 per cent from 2015, according to the National Retail Federation. Dressing pets up for Halloween is becoming more popular with owners, but they need to be cautious when picking their costumes.

Ensure comfortability, otherwise a hazard

Kellie McCutcheon, senior marketing manager at Pet Valu said that owners have to make sure the costume fit their pets comfortably, otherwise it may be a serious hazard.

“Costumes that are too tight may limit circulation, cause painful rubs and, in some instances, interfere with their breathing,” McCutcheon said. “However, if the costume hangs loose, your dog may trip or get tangled in it.”

According to Dr. Michael Dodds, a veterinarian at the Kerrisdale Veterinary Hospital, this practice is both cute and safe. He said he doesn’t see any significant health risks when dressing up your pets.

“I think, most of the time, people that are putting their animals in costumes are relatively into their animals,” Dodds said. “So they’re kind of concerned about what they do.”

Variety of pet costumes on the market

Pet owners say they will be dressing their animals in costumes such as lobsters, superheroes and skeletons this year.

Athena Wong, a Vancouver dog owner, said her Pomeranian, Silky, loves wearing clothes,  including her unicorn, police officer, reindeer and Wonder Woman costumes.

“Silky really likes being dressed in her clothes, but it depends on the pet if they’ll like it” Wong said.

Pet costumes becoming more popular for owners who want matching costumes

Tania Akehurst, a top dog retail sales associate at Barking Babies, a boutique for dogs in Yaletown, said pet costumes are becoming more popular, especially for pet owners who choose to wear the same costume as their pet.

“I think it’s fun to match with somebody and it’s easy to make your dog match with you,” Akehurst said.

According to Akehurst, Wonder Woman is the most popular matching costume for people and their dogs to wear this year.

When it comes to trick-or-treating with your pet, Dodds said owners should take extra care with their pets, as loud noises can easily spook them. He suggests leaving your pets in a safe place at home on Halloween night.

“The dogs aren’t really going out for the chocolate,” Dodds said.

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DOGSmart Rally-O Fun no walk in the dog park for trainers https://www.langaravoice.ca/dogsmart-rally-o-fun-no-walk-in-the-dog-park-for-trainers/ Thu, 19 Oct 2017 01:08:14 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=29694 Reported by Danica Walker Putting a dog through its paces in competion is one way to test its obedience — especially with added distractions. That is one benefit of the DOGSmart Training and Daycare Rally-O Fun Match, according to Jennifer West, the mom of a 14-year-old dog handler. She said that her son Callum Rose, […]]]>

Reported by Danica Walker

Putting a dog through its paces in competion is one way to test its obedience — especially with added distractions. That is one benefit of the DOGSmart Training and Daycare Rally-O Fun Match, according to Jennifer West, the mom of a 14-year-old dog handler. She said that her son Callum Rose, and his dog, a four year old doodle, Rufus, do well during their agility classes at DOGSmart, but once you put them on a course with other dogs, that’s when his skills really shine.

Dog and handler both put to the test

“These fun matches are a way to put those skills to the test to compete against other dogs,” West said. “The agility classes prepare you for these events, but until you’re actually in the ring with other the dogs and the other circumstances, it’s difficult to tell whether you’re actually good at it.”

West says that while Callum Rose and Rufus have a great connection, Rufus does not like when his handler can’t be seen.

“Callum doesn’t have to speak a lot, Rufus follows him and knows his hand signals,” West said. “Something that Rufus struggles with every time, he does not like not being able to see Callum.”

Co-operation is key

Alice Fisher, owner and trainer at DOGSmart, said in order to run the course well, the team has to work together.

“I think they become aware how much their footwork influences the dog,” Fisher said. “One of the cues from the advanced or excellent is where they had to take a jump, and then come back into heel position.”

Six-year-old Australian shepherd, Kane, finished first in the excellent category, and his handler Mary Federici, who is also a trainer at DOGSmart, said that Kane loves to participate in dog obedience events.

“He loves it, you can see he is all crazy,” Federici said. “When he gets in there he is all excited to do it.”

DOGSmart holds Rally-O Fun events once a year and agility fun events twice a year.

 

 

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