Adam Levi – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Thu, 16 May 2019 19:08:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Adam Levi – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Vancouver showcase excites both players and fans https://www.langaravoice.ca/vancouver-showcase-excites-both-players-and-fans/ Wed, 28 Nov 2018 21:24:00 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=34755 Reported by Adam Levi Competitive basketball returned to Vancouver last week for the inaugural Vancouver Showcase. From Nov. 18-24, a dozen of the U.S.’s Division-1 men’s and women’s college basketball teams showed off their skills in front of thousands of fans inside the Vancouver Convention Centre. A lack in competitive basketball Since the NBA’s Vancouver […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

Competitive basketball returned to Vancouver last week for the inaugural Vancouver Showcase.

From Nov. 18-24, a dozen of the U.S.’s Division-1 men’s and women’s college basketball teams showed off their skills in front of thousands of fans inside the Vancouver Convention Centre.

A lack in competitive basketball

Since the NBA’s Vancouver Grizzlies left for Memphis in 2001, Vancouverites have not had the opportunity to see high level competitive basketball.  A fan and Vancouver resident, Assad Thaver, came out for two of the six days the event was held, and is already eager to attend if there is a tournament next season.

“It’s been great,” Thaver said. “It brings out the community and new people to the city.”

There have been exhibition games at the collegiate level in the city before, but this was the first regular season or post season NCAA D1 basketball tournament to take place outside of the U.S. It likely won’t be the last tournament in Vancouver considering the positive turnout and response from players and coaches.

“I loved Vancouver,” said Muffet McGraw the University of Notre Dame women’s head coach. “British Columbia is a beautiful place. It was really a great place to have a tournament.”

A look into the future

McGraw’s team won thewomen’s tournament following a hard-fought battle in the final against Oregon State. After winning the NCAAW National Championship last season, Notre Dame looks poised to contend for another national title this year.

Their star guard and one of the top players in D1 women’s basketball, Arike Ogunbowale, played a significant role during the team’s tournament run. She believes that the strong slate of competition at the tournament has helped prepare Notre Dame for their upcoming games.

“We play the Iowa [Hawkeyes] and then UConn [Huskies] next, so this tournament definitely is going to give us some momentum going in,” Ogunbowale said.

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Craft beer and science join forces in new Langara project https://www.langaravoice.ca/craft-beer-and-science-join-forces-in-new-langara-project/ Mon, 26 Nov 2018 17:10:50 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=34645 Reported by Adam Levi For the last six months, local breweries have partnered with students and professors to better understand the science of beer to create a premium, longer-lasting product. The project has been awarded $200,000 by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Langara science department professors Kelly Sveinson, Ji Yang and […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

For the last six months, local breweries have partnered with students and professors to better understand the science of beer to create a premium, longer-lasting product.

The project has been awarded $200,000 by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Langara science department professors Kelly Sveinson, Ji Yang and Dave Anderson originally spearheaded the project to give students real-world experience in the field while also helping to problem solve with breweries in the Lower Mainland.

Sveinson was quick to note the value of getting an education both inside and outside of the classroom.

“For them, it’s enormously valuable,” Sveinson said about the participating students. “They get a very unique, experiential learning opportunity.”

Success led by students

Yang said that this project wouldn’t be possible if it weren’t for his students tremendous efforts throughout the process.

“Some of our students are top-caliber,” Yang said. “Without my students, I wouldn’t be able to do this project.”

Langara science professor Chris Conway developed a relationship with Parallel 49 Brewing Company to be one of the school’s key partners during this initiative. They have been using the school’s tools and technologies while allowing Langara students to work with their brewers.

According to Parallel 49’s laboratory manager Kelsey Dodds, having access to Langara’s technology has been an invaluable experience that  they wouldn’t have otherwise had had the college not received the grant.

“A lot of people lack the understanding that beer is a living thing,” Dodds said. “Yeast is a living thing that makes the alcohol, beer ages over time, there are flavour developments.”

“When you get access to these highly specialized and highly trained students and pieces of equipment, they get beyond a microscopic view of the beer, you get a molecular look at the beer,” she said.

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South Vancouver high school puts faith into play https://www.langaravoice.ca/south-vancouver-school-puts-faith-into-play/ Fri, 16 Nov 2018 20:00:08 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=34451 Reported by Adam Levi The principles of Judaism have been passed down for thousands of years and the players at King David High School have been using those principles to win games. The junior boys basketball team won a championship for independent schools last season. David Amram, the school’s athletic director, said he’s noticed that […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

The principles of Judaism have been passed down for thousands of years and the players at King David High School have been using those principles to win games.

The junior boys basketball team won a championship for independent schools last season. David Amram, the school’s athletic director, said he’s noticed that his more religiously focused students tend to perform better.

“There are always one or two kids who were a little more spiritual or a little more religious who were always on our winning teams,” Amram said.

Promoting principled play

For King David’s Rabbi Stephen Berger, sports can act as a valuable tool for teaching principled values.

“The game is not the end in itself,” Berger said. “It’s all the different lessons that game brings out, like the ideas of team, sportsmanship and others.”

At the Jewish Community Centre in South Vancouver, recreational sports leagues are based on the same principles as those at King David.

“Of the 140 members in our hockey league, around 80 per cent of them are Jewish,” said the centre’s athletic director Kyle Berger. “I think that’s a pretty impressive number. For the community of just over 25,000 [Jewish people] in Greater Vancouver, that’s not a bad number to have of actual Jewish participants.”

There may not be a long history of successful Jewish athletes, particularly in professional sports, but the high level of interest within the community makes at least one rabbi envious.

“My son’s hockey coach gets everyone at 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning. I can’t get anyone,” Dan Moskovitz joked. “I wish that some of the kids at my synagogue were as religious about religion as they are about sports.”

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Opinion: LSU transparency would benefit all https://www.langaravoice.ca/opinion-lsu-transparency-would-benefit-all/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 16:00:30 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=34256 By Adam Levi  The Langara Students’ Union’s lack of transparency to the student body over the years was unprecedented and unacceptable. New steps towards clarity In early November, the LSU put up a new website where there are designated sections for meeting minutes and annual reports. However, these sections, at the time of this publication, […]]]>

By Adam Levi 

The Langara Students’ Union’s lack of transparency to the student body over the years was unprecedented and unacceptable.

New steps towards clarity

In early November, the LSU put up a new website where there are designated sections for meeting minutes and annual reports. However, these sections, at the time of this publication, read “coming soon.”

Since the students keep the LSU running through their student fees, it is unethical for the organization to withhold information regarding the LSU’s finances.

However, thanks to B.C.’s Societies Act that legally obligates all non-profit organizations to publish meeting minutes and financial records, the LSU is being forced to take a step in the right direction with the new website.

Other schools such as the BCIT, SFU, UVic, Douglas College, UBC and Kwantlen Polytechnic University all publish financial records online. However, Langara is one of the few student unions that has not made records public.

Cloudy history

Members of the LSU have shut out The Voice reporters from meetings and have stonewalled reporters in their attempts to contact board members.

It doesn’t look good when other universities are showing these kinds of records while LSU stands isolated in its secrecy.

Secrecy is a breeding ground for scandal. In 2006, Kwantlen’s student government was marred by a financial scandal involving alleged misappropriation of student funds up to $2 million.

Any incidents like these should not be occurring on any campus at any time, and increased transparency would ensure that would never happen.

The more we know about what is going in the LSU in terms of finances and meetings, the more trusting the student body will be towards it.

An open dialogue between students and the LSU could go a long way to mending the organization’s reputation with students.

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Langara Falcons keep it in the family with father son duo https://www.langaravoice.ca/filial-first-for-falcons/ Sat, 03 Nov 2018 00:00:59 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=34011 Reported by Adam Levi Falcons’ athletic history will be made at the Langara men’s basketball season-opener on Nov. 2 when a son will suit up for the same team his father played on nearly four decades ago. In 1982, Ed Anderson became a member of the Falcons’ men’s basketball team. 36 years later, his son […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

Falcons’ athletic history will be made at the Langara men’s basketball season-opener on Nov. 2 when a son will suit up for the same team his father played on nearly four decades ago.

In 1982, Ed Anderson became a member of the Falcons’ men’s basketball team. 36 years later, his son Tyler Anderson will take to the court, making them the first father-son pair to both have played on the team, according to athletic director, Jake McCallum.

For the men’s basketball coach, Paul Eberhardt, it’s always special to see alumni keep their families connected to Langara athletics.

Falcons basketball player Tyler Anderson poses for a photo with his father Ed. “There’s such a tradition here,” Eberhardt said.

Former Falcons basketball player Ed Anderson posts up his son Tyler. Photo by Adam Levi
One of a kind

Ed and Tyler are not the only example of a family legacy at Langara. Jake McCallum and his father have both worked as Langara’s athletic directors.

“It’s always great when you can have those alumni connections,” Eberhardt said.

More than an alumni connection, the reconnecting of family will be a special moment for Ed as he gets to see Tyler play for the Falcons after he spent his freshman and sophomore years for the Brandon University Bobcats in Manitoba

“The last few years he’s played out of town,” Ed said. “Knowing this year that his games are in the Lower Mainland, just a short drive away, my wife and I are really looking forward to go and watch him.”

Distance and other circumstances may have kept the two apart, but they have been connected by basketball throughout the years. Both were provincial high school all-stars and both will have worn the no. 9 jersey.

One thing is for sure, though, Tyler wants to be the more accomplished athlete in the Anderson family, “I’m here to compete and have fun,” He said. “But, at the end of the day, I’m trying to beat [my dad] so I can have that one-up on him.”

Tyler Anderson grabs the net while standing underneath the basket in the Langara gymnasium. Photo by Adam Levi
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Vancouver Dodgeball League dives into local charities https://www.langaravoice.ca/vancouver-dodgeball-league-dives-into-local-charities/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 21:57:24 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=33632 Reported by Adam Levi When Jasper Lau joined the Vancouver Dodgeball League he had no idea it would become such a big part of his life. Lau was recruited to the VDL by a friend. “She got me into the league. We played once and I was hooked and then I started adding more nights […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

When Jasper Lau joined the Vancouver Dodgeball League he had no idea it would become such a big part of his life.

Lau was recruited to the VDL by a friend.

“She got me into the league. We played once and I was hooked and then I started adding more nights every week,” Lau said.

In the beginning there was dodgeball

In 2004, six friends came together with an idea: they wanted to play dodgeball. Their former schools were willing to host them and their friends on Tuesday nights. Today, over 2,000 dodgeball players on more than 260 teams play at various gymnasiums in south Vancouver four nights a week. There are players aged 19-50 from varying backgrounds and a balance of men and women that are signed up.

The community spirit

Over the years, players have attended special charity games to raise money for causes like Big Brothers Association of Greater Vancouver and The BC Cancer Foundation. Since the league’s inception, the VDL has raised over $54,000. Players have also participated in ocean cleanups and toy drives.

“I would say it’s a living, breathing, amazing community,” said Veronica Woo, a volunteer with the VDL.

Despite a minimum requirement of two women per team, there are also all female teams as well.

As the community has grown, the league has never lost its focus of inclusiveness and giving back.

“This group that we have,” said Truong Cao, one of the six creators of the VDL. “We reach out to the community to help the community with the continued hope of trying to, advance dodgeball in Vancouver and the rest of the world.” The VDL will begin its 27th season in January.

 

 

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Studio 58 wants to start a nationwide conversation about porn https://www.langaravoice.ca/studio-58-wants-to-start-a-nationwide-conversation-about-porn/ Thu, 11 Oct 2018 15:30:21 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=33417 Reported by Adam Levi Langara’s Studio 58 has developed Incognito Mode: A Play About Porn as part of a larger $6.3-million initiative with a main goal in mind: to start a nationwide conversation about sex. On the 27 of September, A Play About Porn addresses the issues of how today’s young generation is affected by […]]]>

Reported by Adam Levi

Langara’s Studio 58 has developed Incognito Mode: A Play About Porn as part of a larger $6.3-million initiative with a main goal in mind: to start a nationwide conversation about sex.

On the 27 of September, A Play About Porn addresses the issues of how today’s young generation is affected by readily-accessible pornography on the internet.

It took months for sex health educators Kenji Maeda and Kristen Gilbert to get the actors feeling comfortable about telling their own stories in front of a crowd. Maeda and Gilbert said they had to figure out how to make A Play About Porn not too uncomfortable for an audience to sit through.

“Our role was creating safety, for sure,” said Gilbert.“We were also responsible for filling the gaps in knowledge that the cast and the other creators had.”

The play, put pornography in the forefront with the actors portraying personal real-life events, experiences they’ve had dealing with issues of sexuality, consent and even pornography.

Kelsey Wavey, an actress in A Play About Porn explained that it took time for her to realize how varied people’s views about porn were.

“It’s been such a learning journey for me,” said Wavey

“I think I’ve learned a lot about listening to others and understanding that there are other journeys out there. Everyone has their own positive and negative feelings about [porn].”

Jashanpreet Kaur, a Langara student who had not yet seen the show believes that the production can make a noticeable impact on how we communicate.

“I think watching this play could make us feel more comfortable with each other,” said Kaur. “I think it could make us not feel so shy around everyone.”

A Play About Porn is part of seven-year project named IMPACTS, led by project director, Dr. Shaheen Shariff. The projects aim is to address sexual violence on university campuses across Canada and globally. It’s Dr. Shariff’s work with her colleagues that earned the millions in donations and grants.

The play ends October 14 at Studio 58, but a portion of the donated money will be used to take A Play About Porn to other college campuses around the country.

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