Video – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca News, entertainment and sports from Langara College journalism students Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:58:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://www.langaravoice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LOGO-100x100.png Video – The Langara Voice https://www.langaravoice.ca 32 32 Video: A new bicycle pathway in Kelowna protects riders from danger of Highway 97 https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-a-new-bicycle-pathway-in-kelowna-protects-riders-from-danger-of-highway-97/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 20:32:59 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48636 New bicycle pathwayBy Henri Benjamin Ngimbis Kelowna is a city built on a valley (the Okanagan valley to be exact) and is enclosed by rocky hills. The shape of the city is limited by the hills in such a way that some neighbourhoods are narrow around busy Highway 97, which usually splits the city in two areas. […]]]> New bicycle pathway

By Henri Benjamin Ngimbis

Kelowna is a city built on a valley (the Okanagan valley to be exact) and is enclosed by rocky hills. The shape of the city is limited by the hills in such a way that some neighbourhoods are narrow around busy Highway 97, which usually splits the city in two areas. During rush hours, cyclists and pedestrians have been victims of fatal accidents along this highway.                                                                                                                               

Fortunately, Kelowna has built a new pathway between UBCO Campus and Downtown Kelowna. The new cyclist pathway is built overtop the defunkt railway between Kelowna and Vancouver. The video shows how cyclists, families with children, joggers and walkers use the new path safely every day, joyfully.

In this video watch Kelowna residents enjoy the bike path and speak on its history.

 

SOURCE: ICBC

 

SOURCE: ICBC

 

 

 

 

 

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Video: Artist builds a relationship with mushrooms in South Vancouver parks https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-artist-builds-a-relationship-with-mushrooms-in-south-vancouver-parks/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 20:28:24 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48752 Reported by Veronika Khvoro “Mushrooms — who are they?” That’s the question Willoughby Arevalo, Vancouver mycologist and artist, wants us to ask.  Together with his partner and artistic collaborator Isabelle Kirouac,  Arevalo directs a series of walking art projects centred on building a relationship with mushrooms. Their series called Walking the Mycelial Web is part […]]]>

Reported by Veronika Khvoro

“Mushrooms — who are they?”

That’s the question Willoughby Arevalo, Vancouver mycologist and artist, wants us to ask. 

Together with his partner and artistic collaborator Isabelle Kirouac,  Arevalo directs a series of walking art projects centred on building a relationship with mushrooms. Their series called Walking the Mycelial Web is part of a residency with the Collingwood Neighbourhood House. 

Arevalo says that fungi show us the way everything in nature is connected. He says humans  can learn much from the way that mushrooms exist in a symbiotic relationship with other beings. Arevalo wants people to build a relationship with fungi as part of reconnecting to the lands that we occupy. 

As part of the Mushroom and Art Walk, Arevalo asked participants to experience mushrooms by touch with their eyes closed, draw mushrooms and then share their insights. Some participants said the activity showed them there’s more to mushrooms than meets the eye.

Watch the full video about the Mushroom and Art Walk below.

 

 

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Video: Bike boom rides second wave as supply chain remains tangled up https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-bike-boom-rides-second-wave-as-supply-chain-remains-tangled-up/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 20:18:21 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48674 By Norman Galimski The second wave of the pandemic bike boom is well underway and the domino effects from last year are stressing the supply chain for bike shops. The changes in who is cycling in Vancouver are becoming visible. In early 2020, bike shops had full inventories of new bicycles, plus any left over […]]]>

By Norman Galimski

The second wave of the pandemic bike boom is well underway and the domino effects from last year are stressing the supply chain for bike shops. The changes in who is cycling in Vancouver are becoming visible.

In early 2020, bike shops had full inventories of new bicycles, plus any left over from the year before, to meet the sudden spike in demand, said Erich Jurgens, owner of The Bike Doctor. But still, many bike shops were sold out by the summer.

“It was a rush unlike anything, I think, the industry has ever seen,” Jurgens said.

However, Jurgens said the bike shortage in the second wave of the bike boom is a symptom of supply and not only increased demand.

Some store owners have said there is no way to even estimate the extent of demand because they can’t get enough new bicycles into the shops to know.

A man rides in the bike lane across the Burrard Street Bridge in Vancouver, B.C. (Photo: Norman Galimski)

Worse than last year

This year, bike shops still aren’t fully restocked and continue to struggle to get new bicycles and parts in.

Amrik Boghar, an employee at Denman Bike Shop, said their store still has around the normal demand, if not more, for bikes, but said that there are about 50 per cent fewer bikes available. This is because suppliers are only working at about 45 per cent of what they normally would pre-pandemic, he said.

One of the biggest changes in the supply chain now is how suppliers are delivering new bicycles to retailers. The economy of scale weighs more than ever on smaller retailers.

“Whoever sells more gets more bikes, and whoever doesn’t sell more doesn’t get it,” Boghar said.

Before, suppliers used to sell their bicycles and parts on a first-come first-serve basis, said Boghar. But now they are supplying to shops that buy the most quantity of bicycles first, which makes it even more difficult for those who can’t buy in large quantities to operate.

The Bike Doctor now gets sporadic deliveries of 20 bikes at a time instead of getting a one time delivery of 500 bikes.

“This year is different because supply is going just as quickly, if not a little quicker, but [bicycles are] not available in one big drop,” Jurgens said. Instead, he said, their supply comes in “fits and starts.”

Changing demographics

The spike in new bike owners over the past year has visibly changed the demographics of cyclists in Vancouver, said Jeff Leigh, the HUB Cycling chair for Vancouver and UBC.

“We have seen a huge number of families with kids on the bikeways – and in routes that we wouldn’t have seen them on before,” Leigh said.

A man rides tandem with a child along the Seawall in Vancouver, B.C. (Photo: Norman Galimski)

 

Vancouver’s cycling lanes and routes are much better than in other cities because the city perceives cycling as important, said Rebecca Mayers, a UBC PhD student whose main field of research is city cycling.

Cycling advocates have a strong voice in the city through groups such as HUB Cycling, among others, that have all affected the building and improvement of cycling infrastructure in Vancouver, Mayers said.

One of the most influential and important factors for Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure, both Leigh and Mayers said, has been the 2017 Complete Streets Framework. This policy gave the city engineer the authority to design and plan city streets independent of council, skipping the often-lengthy city council process.

Mayers said Vancouver cycling benefits from abundant cycling data that the city and third parties, like UBC researchers, collect. This abundance of data helps make the city implement data-based decisions for cycling infrastructure that give confidence in its implementation to the city and its engineers, she said.

Leigh said he believes the majority of new cyclists from the pandemic bike boom are here to stay and will continue to push Vancouver in a more cycling-positive direction.

Watch the video  below to hear from experts on the changes in Vancouver cycling one year into the bike boom:

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Video: Upcoming return to campus looms – students anxious about the unknown https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-upcoming-return-to-campus-looms-students-anxious-about-the-unknown/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 18:45:31 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48648 As B.C. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry announced that universities and colleges will be returning to in-person learning in the fall, students are anxiously wondering what that will look like. With questions around vaccinations, class sizes and possible cohort groups, students are left to prepare themselves without knowing exactly what for. Many are asking […]]]>

As B.C. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry announced that universities and colleges will be returning to in-person learning in the fall, students are anxiously wondering what that will look like.

With questions around vaccinations, class sizes and possible cohort groups, students are left to prepare themselves without knowing exactly what for.

Many are asking whether the timing will be right for their own personal health and safety as the majority of students await to be fully vaccinated later this year.

The Langara Voice reporter Charlie Carey talked to third-year science student, James Gardner, and psychology professor, Dr. Benjamin Cheung, about their potential return.

Watch the video below to hear their thoughts:

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Video: Online activity linked to an increase in eating disorders https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-online-activity-linked-to-an-increase-in-eating-disorders/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 20:32:59 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48379 By Meg McLachlan According to the National Initiatives for Eating Disorders in Canada (NIEDC), one in 10 Canadians with an eating disorder, will die from their illness. Langara Voice reporter Meg McLachlan speaks to Gaya Murthy, a long-time dietitian, about the spike in eating disorders during the pandemic and how programs like Zoom can contribute […]]]>

By Meg McLachlan

According to the National Initiatives for Eating Disorders in Canada (NIEDC), one in 10 Canadians with an eating disorder, will die from their illness.

Langara Voice reporter Meg McLachlan speaks to Gaya Murthy, a long-time dietitian, about the spike in eating disorders during the pandemic and how programs like Zoom can contribute to negative body perceptions.

We speak with Shaely Ritchey who explains her struggle and how our online activity is perpetuating negative eating patterns. Ritchey believes the pandemic has exasperated underlying mental health issues for those who struggle with disordered eating. 

In this video, learn how an increase in online activity can contribute to our eating habits. 

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Video: More research needed on foodborne transmission of the COVID-19 causing virus, scientist says https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-more-research-needed-on-foodborne-transmission-of-the-covid-19-causing-virus-scientist-says/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 20:28:35 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48358 By Emma Gregory The potential for foodborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the COVID-19 causing virus, has not been established. There has been research into this possibility, none of which rules out the possibility of food contamination or fecal oral transmission. Hamada Aboubakr is a postdoctoral research associate at the department of bioproducts and biosystems engineering at […]]]>

By Emma Gregory

The potential for foodborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the COVID-19 causing virus, has not been established.

There has been research into this possibility, none of which rules out the possibility of food contamination or fecal oral transmission.

Hamada Aboubakr is a postdoctoral research associate at the department of bioproducts and biosystems engineering at the University of Minnesota. He and an associate, Sagar Goyal, submitted a paper for peer review in Sept. 2020, outlining the possibility for SARS-CoV-2 to spread via the fecal-oral route or via food.

The COVID causing virus satisfies their criteria for foodborne transmission, and they conclude that more research is needed into the possibility of this occurring.

Similar conclusions are put forward in a Nature Review paper published in Feb. 2021.

Food becomes a transmitter for viruses when it comes into contact with contaminated feces, often via untreated waste water, as explained in Aboubakr’s paper. This is not the same as the outside of food packaging becoming infected as a result of respiratory droplets.

There is an alternative explanation for enteric symptoms, like diarrhea and stomach upset, exhibited by COVID-19 patients. According to mucosal immunologist Lisa Osborne viral infection of the lungs can be spread to the intestines via the bloodstream.

That being said, according to farm veterinarian Philip Chris, the main route of zoonotic disease transmission from animals to humans is feces.

In this video, Hamada Aboubakr, Lisa Osborne, and Philip Chris discuss the routes of transmission for SARS-CoV-2, enteric infection and zoonotic disease. 

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An unsuspected success in Squamish’s business community https://www.langaravoice.ca/an-unsuspected-success-in-squamishs-business-community/ Tue, 16 Mar 2021 03:45:37 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48098 By Caroline Egan Most small businesses have been victims of closures during COVID-19. Many had to close down as they can’t financially support themselves. However Squamish’s small businesses have come together as a whole to help support and expose each other via social media. They Have found creative ways to start events despite public health […]]]>

By Caroline Egan

Most small businesses have been victims of closures during COVID-19. Many had to close down as they can’t financially support themselves.

However Squamish’s small businesses have come together as a whole to help support and expose each other via social media. They Have found creative ways to start events despite public health restrictions.

 

Buying local holds a big influence in how well it can boost local economies. Most of what is spent on local retailers and restaurants circulates directly back into the community.

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South Vancouver community policing centres support neighbourhoods impacted by the pandemic https://www.langaravoice.ca/south-vancouver-community-policing-centres-support-neighbourhoods-impacted-by-the-pandemic/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 21:31:18 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48058 Reported by Catherine Mwitta  Kerrisdale Oakridge Marpole community policing centre (KOMCPC) and South Vancouver community policing centre (SVCPC) provided support to  South Vancouver communities amidst the pandemic, due to Vancouver organizations scaling back outreach operations because of the array of safety issues COVID-19 presents to workers and South Vancouver residents. Many South Vancouver residents could […]]]>

Reported by Catherine Mwitta 

Kerrisdale Oakridge Marpole community policing centre (KOMCPC) and South Vancouver community policing centre (SVCPC) provided support to  South Vancouver communities amidst the pandemic, due to Vancouver organizations scaling back outreach operations because of the array of safety issues COVID-19 presents to workers and South Vancouver residents.

Many South Vancouver residents could no longer access food banks because locations were allowed to only let a limited number of people inside their pantries. Marpole Neighbourhood House recognized this issue and decided to launch an emergency food drive program to help members of the community who lacked food security. Senior Director at Marpole Neighbourhood House Javier Ojer said that KOMCPC helped with setting up “long tables,” enforcing “two metre” social distancing measures and providing “masks” and “hand sanitizers” to those visiting food distributions centres at St. Augustine Church and Marpole Neighbourhood House.

Over on Victoria Drive, the Victoria Drive Business Improvement Association (VDBIA) had difficulty combating graffiti on commercial buildings when the pandemic hit. According to Monique Koningstein, coordinator of events at VDBIA,  The city of Vancouver had abruptly stopped assigning anti-graffiti contractors to the street due to “safety concerns” for their workers and coincidentally amidst the pandemic, she said the graffiti in the area had likewise “increased.” The VDBIA collaborated with SVCPC and its volunteers to remove graffiti in the area. Executive Director Beata Fischer commented about organizing graffiti clean ups and patrolling in Victoria Drive during the pandemic.

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Video: Canadian families in solidarity with international students https://www.langaravoice.ca/canadian-families-in-solidarity-with-international-students/ Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:30:51 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=48056 Produced by Henri Benjamin Ngimbis Life is very expensive in Canadian tourist and university cities such as Kelowna. However, some Canadian families offer free accommodation to international students. Unfortunately, the current pandemic endangers that solidarity because of unemployment and high expenses. In this video, you will hear BILL GORDON, who is a mentor to international […]]]>

Produced by Henri Benjamin Ngimbis

Life is very expensive in Canadian tourist and university cities such as Kelowna. However, some Canadian families offer free accommodation to international students. Unfortunately, the current pandemic endangers that solidarity because of unemployment and high expenses. In this video, you will hear BILL GORDON, who is a mentor to international students in Kelowna.

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Video: Holiday shopping amidst a pandemic https://www.langaravoice.ca/video-holiday-shopping-amidst-a-pandemic/ Fri, 11 Dec 2020 07:52:03 +0000 https://www.langaravoice.ca/?p=47222 Breanne Doyle]]>

Breanne Doyle

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