Solutions for emotional problems should be based in reality

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By Sableen Minhas

Being a young adult is not easy.

Assignments, jobs, break ups, make-ups and the constant pressure to do well in studies, there’s just so much to deal with.Minhas_Sableen_A1

With so much going on in life, experiencing an existential crisis is unavoidable. When life becomes a huge question mark, feeling low, depressed or moody is only natural. So, how do we deal with this?

Fear of being judged makes virtual solutions appealing

Talking to friends, parents or even a complete stranger may help, but we live in a smart world. Searching for “how to be happy” on Google or installing mental health applications like BoosterBuddy on smartphones, seem more convenient than talking to a person.

Although these virtual applications are helpful to some extent, I think real-life problems have to be dealt with in reality. Looking for support in the virtual sphere might be appealing, but for me it is not an appropriate solution.

The major factor behind the appeal of such apps is that they save people from being judged by others.

What we do not realise is that whenever we install an app on our phones we give it access to our photo gallery, messages, call logs and even contact list at times.

More trouble than it’s worth

In short, we compromise more personal information when we use these apps because there is eventually a person monitoring them.

I think the appropriate way to deal with mental health issues, is to talk and not chat. Chatting with online support groups or self-diagnosing mental health are not permanent solutions.

Talk to people who care for you, like your friends, parents or maybe approach a counsellor if the fear of being judged is holding you back.

Mental health apps can only be a supplement to the process of overcoming any such issues. They cannot replace the exchange of emotions, empathy and comfort that comes with talking to a person.

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