Riverfront Garden slated for Fraserview after Vancouver park board approval

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The recently-approved Riverfront Garden will allow locals to grow fruit and vegetables in Vancouver’s Fraserview area. Photo by Chris Slater.
The recently-approved Riverfront Garden will allow locals to grow fruit and vegetables in Vancouver’s Fraserview area. Photo by Chris Slater.

SouthVancouver residents are getting a new community garden following the Vancouver park board’s unanimous approval of the project earlier this month.

The Riverfront Garden will be incorporated around an existing tennis court, located between Elliot and Jellicoe Streets near the north bank of the Fraser River.

The project, sponsored by both the South Vancouver Family Place Society and Fraserlands Community Gardening Group, was approved Jan. 20 and will see 40 garden plots spread over 630 square metres of park space. It will include amenities such as a tool shed, fruit-bearing trees, pollinator boxes and an area for compost production.

“We see this as a great place to bring the community together,” said Judith Horvath, chair of Fraserlands Community Gardening Group.  “There’s a lot of social housing [in the area] so I think there are people there who would certainly benefit from being able to grow some food.”

More public green space for South Vancouver residents 

Horvath explained there are not many public green spaces in south Vancouver and the newly approved community garden has been embraced by residents.

“There have been a number of people [in the area] over the years who have on their own tried to petition the city for a community garden.”

Sharon Babu of the South Vancouver Family Place Society is also pleased with the park board’s decision.

“There are no amenities down there so whatever we can get that can…support that grassroots community development is just great.”

Once the project is completed, members of the community will be able to reserve a space by putting their name on a list that is compiled on a first-come, first-served basis. Residents can keep their plot until they decide they no longer want it, when it will be passed on to the next applicant.  There will be a small fee for each plot to help cover insurance costs.

Horvath estimates construction of the gardens could begin as early as spring.

Reported by Chris Slater

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