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Panel celebrates 50 years of Langara journalism program

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On Oct. 23, Frances Bula moderated Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program's 50th anniversary. Photo: Vivian Chui
On Oct. 23, Frances Bula moderated Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program’s 50th anniversary. Photo: Vivian Chui

Journalism will always be about telling important stories to the public according to panelists at the Langara Journalism program’s 50th anniversary celebration event, Journalism: The Next 50 Years, at the CBC Broadcast Centre on Oct. 23.

Moderated by Frances Bula, the department chair of Langara journalism, the event featured Harold Munro (The Vancouver Sun), Alison Broddle (CBC/Radio-Canada), Simi Sara (CKNW), Jane Armstrong (The Tyee), and Gary Mason (The Globe and Mail) discussing the future of journalism.

Harold Munro, editor-in-chief of The Vancouver Sun, envisions print, television and radio converging because in the end, it is all about great storytelling.”

Journalists will play a significant role in curating the increasing amount of content available to readers, Munro said.

He was also weary of the danger of over-filtering, causing readers to consume news in a “personalized universe that feeds our narrow worldview.”

Alison Broddle, executive producer of news at CBC/Radio-Canada, echoed the sentiment.

“You can get who, what, when, and where from hundreds of sources, but journalists will still always add the why,” said Broddle.

On Oct. 23, journalists gathered at Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program's 50th anniversary. Left to right: Gary Mason, Alison Broddle, Frances Bula, Jane Armstrong, Simi Sara and Harld Munro. Photo: Amrit Gil (Twitter)
On Oct. 23, journalists gathered at Journalism: The Next 50 Years, a panel to celebrate the program’s 50th anniversary. Left to right: Gary Mason, Alison Broddle, Frances Bula, Jane Armstrong, Simi Sara and Harld Munro. Photo: Amrit Gil (Twitter)

Simi Sara, host of CKNW’s The Simi Sara Show, says it is journalists’ responsibility to make important stories interesting to the public.

“[Some] say you can’t do too much politics, it bores people. I don’t buy that philosophy,” said Sara.

Jane Armstrong, new editor-in-chief of independent online magazine The Tyee, spoke of crowdfunding, where individuals contribute to a project via the Internet, and its role in “ensuring good stories get told.”

In the Netherlands, an entire media organization has been financed through crowdfunding, said Armstrong. “It has a kind of democratic appeal to me.”

Journalism educator Marc Edge said the Internet is still missing local news. “We can read the best journalism from around the world, but who’s covering city hall?”

Reported by Vivian Chui

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  1. […] see Vivian Chui‘s story on page 2 of the Oct. 30 issue of The Voice as well as Ash Kelly‘s story and […]

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