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No new leads at fourth Wendy Ladner-Beaudry murder anniversary

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IHIT's Jennifer Pound at the press conference in Pacific Spirit Park on April 3, 2013. Photo: Garin Fahlman
IHIT’s Jennifer Pound at the press conference in Pacific Spirit Park on April 3, 2013. Photo: Garin Fahlman

After four years of investigation, there have still been no arrests made regarding the murder of Wendy Ladner-Beaudry.

In 2009, Ladner-Beaudry was attacked while jogging through Pacific Spirit Park, and was left to die on the trail. The 53-year-old left behind her two children and husband Michel Beaudry.

Jennifer Pound, a spokeswoman for the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team (IHIT) told reporters at a press conference held near the site of Ladner-Beaudry’s death on Wednesday that they are still looking for the killer.

“We still don’t know a motive,” Pound said. “It’s extremely frustrating. Four years is a long time.”

200 persons of interest, no arrests

Pound confirmed that over 200 people have been identified as suspects, but no arrests have yet been made. “In some cases when a person of interest has been identified, it can take months to figure out whether they are a suspect.”

Pound said adding to the difficulties is that Ladner-Beaudry’s murder is not similar to any other crime, which makes finding a lead more difficult.

Also at the conference was Ladner-Beaudry’s brother Peter Ladner, a former Vancouver city councillor, and sister Nancy Edmonds.

Her husband Michel was not present.

The poster at the southeast entrance of Pacific Spirit Park is a constant reminder that the murder of Wendy Ladner-Beaudry is still unsolved. Photo: Katja De Bock
The poster at the southeast entrance of Pacific Spirit Park is a constant reminder that the murder of Wendy Ladner-Beaudry is still unsolved. Photo: Katja De Bock

Ladner spoke about his concern that until his sister’s killer has been found, women will feel unsafe walking the parks in a city he doesn’t think anyone should be afraid of.

When questioned about any possible leads, both Ladner and Edmonds said that the most obvious suspects have already been ruled out.

IHIT asks that anyone with information should contact them anonymously.

Family hoping to solve the case

Four years later, with no arrests and few answers, some at the conference wondered whether there is any hope of justice.

Ladner and Edmonds shared a smile at the mention of hope. “Of course there’s hope,” said Ladner. “We owe it to Wendy to be here today. We can’t rest until this case is solved.”

Reported by Garin Fahlman

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