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Langara college holds research showcase for flashy, exciting and engaging projects

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The Electric Heart, a wearable electronic garment that respond to the wearer's heartbeat, was one of the projects at last year's showcase. (Langara College submitted)
The Electric Heart, a wearable electronic garment that respond to the wearer’s heartbeat, was one of the projects at last year’s showcase. (Langara College submitted)

Reported by Mel Edgar

Heads up students, the deadline for entering the third annual Langara Research Showcase is Nov. 7.

The showcase will be held on Nov. 19 and 20 in the breezeway between Buildings A and B from 11:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Margaret Heldman, dean of science at Langara, said the showcase is held so the college can exhibit something really flashy, exciting and engaging.  She said everybody is welcome because research is being done in every department at the college in every way.

Margaret Heldman, Langara’s dean of science, pictured here in her office, would eventually like the research showcase to be a weeklong event. Picture taken October 30, 2014
Margaret Heldman, Langara’s dean of science, pictured here in her office, would eventually like the research showcase to be a weeklong event. (MEL EDGAR photo)

Not just for sciences

Criteria for what constitutes scholarly research are very open, and everybody from science to arts students are welcome to participate, said Tomo Tanaka, division chair of creative arts at Langara.

There’s a couple ways students can participate, said Tanaka. “They can simply be a volunteer and help set up and take down, or if they have research that they would like to showcase they can come direct to us or through their instructor.”

Research is more than just people with lab coats and microscopes, explained Tanaka. “Artists do applied research every day when they create something.”

Examples of research projects entered this year include a book about Nunavut, Canadian history and climate change, a presentation about the European fire ant invasion of B.C. and an audio/visual presentation about the applications of biochar, a form of carbon made from biomass.

Giselle Lemay, Langara publishing instructor, said publishing students are currently designing infographics, popular data visualizations in magazines, books and newspapers. “[This] will be a great opportunity to show what publishing students have done to present research data in a highly visual and attractive way.”

Kathryn Taylor, a third-year science student at Langara said, students get a lot out of participating in the showcase and get to share what they’ve been working on, with others.

“We also get a sense of accomplishment by putting together all the data we have found and seeing the project as a whole.”

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