Culture clubs promote diversity, help students connect with one another

7

Reported by Clare Hennig

diwali-culture-club
Langara students celebrate Diwali on Nov. 10, in a party hosted by the South Asian Club and the Langara Students’ Union. Photo by Clare Hennig

Students clubs that centre around culture are helping students connect in a different way.

At Langara, nearly a quarter of the student clubs are focused on a specific culture or language.

Whether cultural clubs are a way to practice a new language or an opportunity to speak a native language, they indicate the multiculturalism on campus.

Engaging with culture clubs

Nathania Santoso, who moved to Vancouver a year ago from Jakarta, joined the Garuda Indonesia – Langara Association as soon as she started at the college.

“It feels great if you meet people with your own language, you’re able to engage with them more,” Santoso said.

Dwiputra Yogiswara, president of the club, said many the cultural clubs are focused on creating a home-away-from-home for international students from specific countries.

“We want to help international Indonesian students get to know Vancouver a lot better … [and] help them get used to Canadian society,” said Yogiswara.
The majority of the members of the club are Indonesian, said Yogiswara, but they host events like Indonesia Independence Day celebrations for the general public.

Bryce Young, president of the Langara French Club, said the cultural clubs are very much in line with the multiculturalism of the college and the nation.

Diversity on campus

Langara students attend an art event with the French club at Le Centre Culturel to experience of francophone culture and language. Submitted photo, Abbey Zhong (via ).
Langara students attend an art event with the French club at Le Centre Culturel to experience of francophone culture and language. Submitted photo by Abbey Zhong (via Langara French Club).

“Canada is such a diverse place, I think it’s really important to be multi-cultural – to accept and learn about other cultures and languages,” Young said.

The French club is mainly focused on language and about 90 per cent of the members are enrolled in beginner French language classes.

Young said it gives them a place to practice the language and learn more about francophone culture.

“Canada is a bilingual country with English and French so I think it’s pretty important for people to at least understand French and their culture,” Young said.

For more information about Langara clubs online, you can check them out here at the school’s website.

You might also like More from author

Comments are closed.